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Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University

Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University
Stanford, CA

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Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University
328 Lomita Drive at Museum Way
Stanford, CA 94305-5060
Telephone 650-723-4177
Fax 650-725-0464
Map


museum.stanford.edu/index.html
Through Diebenkorn’s "Window": Transitions in Time
April 18, 2018–August 12, 2018

Several hidden compositions lie below the surface of Window by painter and Stanford graduate Richard Diebenkorn, BA ’49. These compositions were unknown to the art community except as barely visible reworkings until brought to light by Stanford student Katherine Van Kirk, ’19, during her Chen-Yang fellowship in the Cantor’s Art+Science Lab. This installation shows the multiple layers uncovered through infrared reflectography as evidence—in a single painting—of the transition Diebenkorn was making in his art from the mid-1950s to the '60s. Viewers will have a chance to discover the hidden works themselves using interactive digital media and in early drawings in the artist’s sketchbooks and other works in the Cantor's collection.

This exhibition is organized by the Cantor Arts Center. We gratefully acknowledge support from the Bank of America Art Conservation Project.

Through Diebenkorn’s "Window": Transitions in Time
April 18, 2018–August 12, 2018

Several hidden compositions lie below the surface of Window by painter and Stanford graduate Richard Diebenkorn, BA ’49. These compositions were unknown to the art community except as barely visible reworkings until brought to light by Stanford student Katherine Van Kirk, ’19, during her Chen-Yang fellowship in the Cantor’s Art+Science Lab. This installation shows the multiple layers uncovered through infrared reflectography as evidence—in a single painting—of the transition Diebenkorn was making in his art from the mid-1950s to the '60s. Viewers will have a chance to discover the hidden works themselves using interactive digital media and in early drawings in the artist’s sketchbooks and other works in the Cantor's collection.

This exhibition is organized by the Cantor Arts Center. We gratefully acknowledge support from the Bank of America Art Conservation Project.

Betray the Secret: Humanity in the Age of "Frankenstein"
Through August 5, 2018
Ruth Levison Halperin Gallery

Marking the 200th anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus, Stanford University is organizing Frankenstein@200. This yearlong series of courses, lectures, conferences, and a film festival will highlight the relevance of Shelley’s text today, as artificial intelligence and advances in engineering and medicine increasingly blur the divide between man and machine. An associated exhibition drawn from the Cantor’s permanent collection will explore the idea of what defines humanity in the age of Frankenstein.

The Dancing Sowei: Performing Beauty in Sierra Leone
Through December 21, 2018
Rowland K. Rebele Gallery

This exhibition focuses on one spectacular work in the Cantor’s collection—a sowei mask, used by the women-only Sande Society that is unique to Sierra Leone. Used in dance by senior women of the society, the sowei mask symbolizes knowledge of feminine grace and is part of a young girl’s initiation into adulthood. Thus, for many women of the region, beauty is literally performed into existence through ndoli jowei (the dancing sowei or the sowei mask in performance). Take an in-depth look at a sowei’s aesthetic expressions of elegance, from its serene gaze of inner spirituality to the corpulent neck rolls that signify health and wealth—a beauty as defined and danced by women.
This exhibition is organized by the Cantor Arts Center. We gratefully acknowledge support from the C. Diane Christensen Fund for African Art and the Phyllis Wattis Program Fund.

The Matter of Photography in the Americas
February 7, 2018 - April 30, 2018

Featuring artists from twelve different countries, this exhibition presents a wide range of creative responses to photography as an artistic medium and a communicative tool uniquely suited to modern media landscapes and globalized economies. The artists in this exhibition resist the impulse to “document” or “photograph anew” the world immediately around them. Instead, they employ a wide range of materials — from prints and drawings to photocopies and audio installations — to highlight the ways in which photography shapes our understanding of history as well as current events.

Working Metal in 20th-Century Sculpture
Through 04/30/2018

Metal sculpture created directly by the artist’s hand is the focus of a new exhibition by Sydney Skelton Simon, a PhD candidate in the Department of Art & Art History, whose proposal was selected in the fall. Featuring small-scale sculptures, photographs, and sound recordings, this exhibition explores modes of working with metal that depart from more traditional casting methods.

Framing in Time: Photographs from the Cantor Arts Center Reimagined
Through May 28, 2018

Each of the short, student-made films in this exhibition will appropriate and re-imagine a photograph from the Cantor’s collection. Striving to shed new light on the original context of the photographs, the films will be shown alongside the Cantor photographs that served as their inspiration. The short films were made by Stanford students in Assistant Professor of Art Srdan Keca’s “Archival Cinema” class during fall quarter 2017.

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