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Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University

Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University
Stanford, CA

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Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University
328 Lomita Drive at Museum Way
Stanford, CA 94305-5060
Telephone 650-723-4177
Fax 650-725-0464
Map


museum.stanford.edu/index.html
Josiah McElheny: Island Universe
February 23, 2019–August 18, 2019

Bringing artist Josiah McElheny’s Island Universe to the Cantor is a rare opportunity to examine both cutting-edge art and physics. The monumental installation is a visual response to recent theories of the multiverse, an elaboration of the Big Bang theory. The installation is both visually stunning and carefully constructed according to measurements that map the history of time. McElheny worked closely with distinguished Ohio State University professor of astronomy David Weinberg to develop those measurements. The five hanging chandeliers, which incorporate precise scientific calculations, are modeled on the chandeliers of the Metropolitan Opera in New York—iconic midcentury design objects that were made in Vienna in 1965. That year, the first physical evidence for the Big Bang theory became public, launching popular interest in space science. McElheny’s installation—made of chromed metal, transparent handblown glass, and lights— represents potential universes whose dense origins expand outwards.

Kerry Tribe: The Elusive Word
February 23, 2019–July 7, 2019

The Cantor Arts Center will be presenting two films by Los Angeles-based visual artist Kerry Tribe. The first, Critical Mass (2013), on view from February 23–April 29, features a live, performed reenactment of a couple’s heavily edited argument taken from Hollis Frampton’s experimental 1971 film by the same name. Tribe offers modern viewers a fresh look at the struggle to find the words to express how one feels.

The second film, Afasia (2017), on view from May 1–July 7, pairs the verbal journey of Christopher Riley, a photographer and friend of the filmmaker who struggles to speak after experiencing a left-hemisphere stroke that left him aphasic, with Tribe’s own narrated effort to relearn the Spanish language. Engaging in repetition and vocalization, the two friends find commonalities in a mutual curiosity about life at the limits of language.

During her residency on campus, as a guest of the Stanford Arts Institute, Tribe will teach two courses, one during the winter quarter titled Art in the Age of Neuroscienceand the other during the spring quarter titled Practice and Critique. Tribe’s films and installations have been exhibited widely including at MoMA, Tate Modern, and, most recently, they were the subject of a solo exhibition at SFMoMA.

A companion exhibition is on view at the Anderson Collection at Stanford University, February 28 through July 29, 2019.

STRAY: A GRAPHIC TONE
February 23, 2019–June 16, 2019
Pigott Family Gallery

Artist Shannon Ebner’s work, coming to the Cantor in February, is part of an ongoing, multimedia, and genre-defying project that began in 2016. Comprised of audio recordings, photographs, and literary components, Ebner’s STRAY investigates the ways in which objects and language can shift away from their intended uses, creating new meanings in the process. Through examining these limits, she explores the role of the artist in the act of creation.

The Medium Is the Message: Art since 1950
February 23, 2019–August 18, 2019
photo

Edward Kienholz and Nancy Reddin Kienholz (Edward Kienholz: U.S.A., 1927–1994; Nancy Kienholz: U.S.A., b. 1943), The Billionaire Deluxe, 1977. Metal, Fresnel lens system, light bulb, and solid-state electronic second counter. Gift of the Marmor Foundation (Drs. Michael and Jane Marmor) from the collection of Drs. Judd and Katherine Marmor, 2007.57
Pigott Family Gallery

It is the medium that shapes and controls the scale and form of human association and action.
—Marshall McLuhan, “The Medium Is the Message”

Using works created since 1950, this exhibition explores the relationship between subject, content, and the materials that informed each object’s production.

The exhibition is divided into three broad categories that explore the notion of “medium” in its various contexts: a means of communication, the materials from which an art object is created, and a mediating apparatus between objects and subjects.

“In the Abstract,” explores how paint, metal, and fabric can be used as means of abstract communication. “The Sum of Its Parts” explores how artists have used nontraditional art materials for critical and expressive inquiry. Lastly, “The Faces We Present” reconsiders the limits of figural representation, investigating how portraiture can serve as a mediating apparatus between the past and the present.

Viewed collectively, these works suggest that an exploration of medium is one way of challenging dominant discourses around art, culture, and history.

Kahlil Joseph: BLKNWS
Through June 16, 2019

Kahlil Joseph, a visiting artist in the new Presidential Residencies on the Future of the Arts program, presents BLKNWS, a two-channel video projection that is displayed at the Cantor, the dining hall in Lagunita and, Harmony House. The broadcast project blurs the lines between art, journalism, entrepreneurship, and cultural critique.

This exhibition is organized by the Cantor Arts Center. The residency is hosted in collaboration with the Institute for Diversity in the Arts. We gratefully acknowledge support from the Office of the President, Stanford University.

Painting Nature in the American Gilded Age
September 5, 2018–August 25, 2019
Ruth Levison Halperin Gallery

Drawing from the Cantor’s permanent collection, this exhibition considers how nature was depicted by American artists from the 1880s to 1910, an era of unprecedented industrialization and urban development. Through landscapes, portraits, and still lifes, the exhibition highlights the importance of nature for artists and the public, both of whom increasingly were affected by machines, cities, and crowds.

We gratefully acknowledge support from the Halperin Exhibitions Fund.

The Dancing Sowei: Performing Beauty in Sierra Leone
Through 04/29/2019
Rowland K. Rebele Gallery

This exhibition focuses on one spectacular work in the Cantor’s collection—a sowei mask, used by the women-only Sande Society that is unique to Sierra Leone. Used in dance by senior women of the society, the sowei mask symbolizes knowledge of feminine grace and is part of a young girl’s initiation into adulthood. Thus, for many women of the region, beauty is literally performed into existence through ndoli jowei (the dancing sowei or the sowei mask in performance). Take an in-depth look at a sowei’s aesthetic expressions of elegance, from its serene gaze of inner spirituality to the corpulent neck rolls that signify health and wealth—a beauty as defined and danced by women.
This exhibition is organized by the Cantor Arts Center. We gratefully acknowledge support from the C. Diane Christensen Fund for African Art and the Phyllis Wattis Program Fund.

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