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Monterey Museum of Art Monterey, CA

Monterey Museum of Art

Monterey Museum of Art-Pacific Street
559 Pacific Street,
Monterey, CA 93940
831.372.5477
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e-mail: info@montereyart.org


www.montereyart.org
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Transformations: Photography by William Giles
May 13 – August 29, 2021

“The beauty of photography is that those few and rare moments of becoming one with the object seen, can later be shared with others, and like stars in the sky, give meaning to one’s life.” -William Giles

William Giles (American, b. 1934) is best known for his beautiful gelatin silver prints of nature and landscapes in which we feel a spiritual presence. His art is literally one of seeing and making visible the energy and life inherent in all things. The two series on view here, Tar Landscapes and Manipulated Polaroids, are examples of how the artist contemplated new surroundings and reinterpreted them. The images in both projects deal with transformation, whether it be the physical transformation of the Polaroid or the visual transformation caused by abstraction and the use of the photographer’s frame. Giles studied with Minor White in Rochester, New York, and this mentor had a profound influence on his photography, his spirituality, and his teaching methods. In the artist’s words, “Minor was like a beacon of radiant light to me in the late 1950s. He gave me the courage to keep throwing out my nets into the dark waters of my own unknowing to discover the first flickers of light, before it became form.” White taught him that sight was proportional to insight, that a camera should act as a conscious tool for what the photographer wants to say. Light became Giles’ muse and his desire to visualize his ideas, feelings, and spirituality became paramount and inextricably linked to his image-making. As an artist, he not only focused on the importance of seeing, but also on the viewer’s experience when looking at the photograph and the photograph’s ability to transform. He wishes for us all to really see and hopefully to be awakened.

-Ann Jastrab, Executive Director, Center for Photographic Art

Many people were instrumental in making this exhibition possible. Special thanks to Norma Brambilla, John Carney, Stuart Chase, Chuck Davis, Rory Earnshaw, Patrick Ireland, Greg Mettler, Jim Needham, Kenneth Parker, Robin V. Robinson, Ryuijie, Sarah Spencer, and MMA staff Corey Madden, John Rexine, and Noah Gonzalez.
May 13 – August 29, 2021

“The beauty of photography is that those few and rare moments of becoming one with the object seen, can later be shared with others, and like stars in the sky, give meaning to one’s life.” -William Giles

William Giles (American, b. 1934) is best known for his beautiful gelatin silver prints of nature and landscapes in which we feel a spiritual presence. His art is literally one of seeing and making visible the energy and life inherent in all things. The two series on view here, Tar Landscapes and Manipulated Polaroids, are examples of how the artist contemplated new surroundings and reinterpreted them. The images in both projects deal with transformation, whether it be the physical transformation of the Polaroid or the visual transformation caused by abstraction and the use of the photographer’s frame. Giles studied with Minor White in Rochester, New York, and this mentor had a profound influence on his photography, his spirituality, and his teaching methods. In the artist’s words, “Minor was like a beacon of radiant light to me in the late 1950s. He gave me the courage to keep throwing out my nets into the dark waters of my own unknowing to discover the first flickers of light, before it became form.” White taught him that sight was proportional to insight, that a camera should act as a conscious tool for what the photographer wants to say. Light became Giles’ muse and his desire to visualize his ideas, feelings, and spirituality became paramount and inextricably linked to his image-making. As an artist, he not only focused on the importance of seeing, but also on the viewer’s experience when looking at the photograph and the photograph’s ability to transform. He wishes for us all to really see and hopefully to be awakened.

-Ann Jastrab, Executive Director, Center for Photographic Art

Many people were instrumental in making this exhibition possible. Special thanks to Norma Brambilla, John Carney, Stuart Chase, Chuck Davis, Rory Earnshaw, Patrick Ireland, Greg Mettler, Jim Needham, Kenneth Parker, Robin V. Robinson, Ryuijie, Sarah Spencer, and MMA staff Corey Madden, John Rexine, and Noah Gonzalez.

The 2021 Weston Scholarship Exhibition
Through August 22, 2021

The Weston Scholarship educates and enlightens the community about the legacy of photography on the West Coast. This recognition program keeps the traditional process of black and white fine art photography alive in the tradition of twentieth-century photographers such as, Edward Weston and Ansel Adams. The Monterey Museum of Art maintains a distinguished collection of California Central Coast photography including four generations of Westons. This year the Museum celebrates this photographic legacy by showcasing a selection of work by past Scholarship recipients, while the 2021 virtual competition is hosted online by the Weston Collective (https://www.thewestoncollective.org/about-the-weston-scholarship).

The Weston Collective was established in 2004 by Gina and Kim Weston to support high school and college students studying fine art photography in Monterey County. Gina, Kim and their son Zach wish to foster photographic education as a way of nurturing a medium they love. The Weston Scholarship Portfolio Competition is specifically focused on students practicing analogue black and white film photography in Monterey and recently to students in Santa Cruz County. They offer students, artists, educators and the community the opportunity to experience the richness of photography through scholarships, a community darkroom, mentorships, exhibitions, workshops, publications, lectures, video and artists in residence. The Weston Scholarship awards scholarships at various levels. Scholarships range from $1000 first place awards to $200 honorable mentions. ​Since 2004, the Weston Scholarship has awarded 375 scholarships totaling $126,000.

The Monterey Museum of Art is delighted to partner with this important nonprofit organization and to present this look back at past Scholarship exhibitions.

#filmisnotdead

Color Duets: Kaffe Fassett and Erin Lee Gafill
Through October 10, 2021

In a redwood canyon down the Big Sur coast sits a small cabin. Each spring artists Kaffe Fassett and his niece Erin Lee Gafill share a stolen week sitting side by side at their easels to paint. During these stolen weeks, they share a decade long visual conversation that began long ago in their family home at Nepenthe. Fassett is known as a textile designer, Gafill as a landscape painter. The two share a common language in paint, and a passion for color.

Color Duets invites us behind the scenes of two artists’ vision, process, and influences. It pulls back the veil, revealing the inspiration, craft, and environment that bring new artworks into being. There are more than just two voices here. One sees echoes of Giorgio Morandi, a favorite of both artists, with his obsessive repetition of subjects and soulful chromatic grays, the color-drenched influence of Emile Nolde and his flower portraits, and the delight of color, bold pattern, and the home celebrated by Matisse.

About the Artists
Kaffe Fassett is a world-renowned textile designer at the height of his career. His niece Erin Lee Gafill is a mid-career artist, an award winning painter and teacher. They share a common upbringing in Big Sur, California, with roots in the arts going back to their childhoods at Nepenthe Restaurant. This creative Mecca was founded by Kaffe’s parents Lolly and Bill Fassett. Their shared ancestor was Jane Gallatin Powers, an early California painter who had the first art studio in Carmel in 1904.

Kaffe revolutionized knitwear in the 80’s with his extraordinary use of color and pattern. He is a pioneer in contemporary needlepoint, mosaic, quilting, and fabric design. Here, he returns to his roots – painting – through the tradition of still life. Erin, known for large scale abstracted landscapes and boldly colored still lifes displays a new voice here with her muted palette, emphasis on overlapping pattern, and chromatic range.

Purchase the Catalog
Color Duets is a new book of original artwork, textiles, and family stories. It memorializes a series of artist retreats shared by Kaffe Fassett and his niece, Erin Lee Gafill over the last twelve years.

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