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de Young Museum
Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
San Francisco, CA

Museum image courtesy of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco

de Young Museum
Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
Golden Gate Park
50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive
San Francisco, CA 94118
415.750.3600
Map


deyoung.famsf.org

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Judy Chicago: A Retrospective
August 28, 2021 – January 9, 2022

The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco celebrate pioneering feminist artist Judy Chicago with a retrospective spanning from her early engagement with the Californian Light and Space Movement in the 1960s to her current body of work, a searing investigation of mortality and environmental devastation, begun in 2015. The exhibition includes approximately 130 paintings, prints, drawings, and ceramic sculptures, in addition to ephemera, several films, and a documentary. Together, these works of art chart the boundary-pushing path of the artist named Cohen by birth and Gerowitz by marriage, who, after trying to fit into the patriarchal structure of the Los Angeles art world, decided to change her name and the course of history.

Organized on the heels of the 40th anniversary of Chicago's landmark installation, The Dinner Party, in San Francisco and opening in conjunction with the 100th anniversary of women’s right to vote across the United States, Judy Chicago: A Retrospective pays homage to an artist whose lifelong fight against the suppression and erasure of women’s creativity has finally come full circle.
Image: Judy Chicago, "Through the Flower 2" (detail), 1973. Sprayed acrylic on canvas, 60 x 60 in (152.4 x 152.4 cm). Collection of Diane Gelon. © Judy Chicago / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photograph © Donald Woodman / ARS, New York

n October 1970, Judy Chicago announced her chosen identity with a full page ad in Artforum, divesting “herself of all names imposed upon her through male social dominance.” The same year, Chicago founded the first feminist arts education program in the United States at California State University, Fresno, then instated its second iteration with Miriam Shapiro at the California Institute of the Arts a year later. Their efforts culminated in the establishment of the Feminist Studio Workshop as part of the Women’s Building in 1973, a program and institution that celebrated and nourished the creative growth and recognition of women artists from around the world. With the program thus established, Chicago turned her attention back to her own practice, leaving academia to dedicate herself more fully to researching and surfacing the histories of women in Western civilization and combating the systemic erasure of women’s achievements from (art) historical record.

August 28, 2021 – January 9, 2022

The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco celebrate pioneering feminist artist Judy Chicago with a retrospective spanning from her early engagement with the Californian Light and Space Movement in the 1960s to her current body of work, a searing investigation of mortality and environmental devastation, begun in 2015. The exhibition includes approximately 130 paintings, prints, drawings, and ceramic sculptures, in addition to ephemera, several films, and a documentary. Together, these works of art chart the boundary-pushing path of the artist named Cohen by birth and Gerowitz by marriage, who, after trying to fit into the patriarchal structure of the Los Angeles art world, decided to change her name and the course of history.

Organized on the heels of the 40th anniversary of Chicago's landmark installation, The Dinner Party, in San Francisco and opening in conjunction with the 100th anniversary of women’s right to vote across the United States, Judy Chicago: A Retrospective pays homage to an artist whose lifelong fight against the suppression and erasure of women’s creativity has finally come full circle.
Image: Judy Chicago, "Through the Flower 2" (detail), 1973. Sprayed acrylic on canvas, 60 x 60 in (152.4 x 152.4 cm). Collection of Diane Gelon. © Judy Chicago / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photograph © Donald Woodman / ARS, New York

n October 1970, Judy Chicago announced her chosen identity with a full page ad in Artforum, divesting “herself of all names imposed upon her through male social dominance.” The same year, Chicago founded the first feminist arts education program in the United States at California State University, Fresno, then instated its second iteration with Miriam Shapiro at the California Institute of the Arts a year later. Their efforts culminated in the establishment of the Feminist Studio Workshop as part of the Women’s Building in 1973, a program and institution that celebrated and nourished the creative growth and recognition of women artists from around the world. With the program thus established, Chicago turned her attention back to her own practice, leaving academia to dedicate herself more fully to researching and surfacing the histories of women in Western civilization and combating the systemic erasure of women’s achievements from (art) historical record

Hung Liu: Golden Gate (金門)
Through March 13, 2022

Hung Liu: Golden Gate (金門) is located in the de Young's Wilsey Court, which is a space free to the public starting on July 17, 2021.

Born in Changchun, China, in 1948, Hung Liu grew up under the Maoist regime. Trained in the Socialist Realist style of painting, she elevates the subjects of archival photographs, re-creating them in the grand scale and lyrical style of history painting. Challenging primary sources, officially sanctioned documents, and revisionist accounts, Liu foregrounds displaced and wandering people frequently left out of traditional historical narratives and resurfaces stories lost to time. In Hung Liu: Golden Gate (金門), her site-specific installation combining existing and new work in Wilsey Court, Liu highlights international and domestic narratives of migration. Reimagining some of her most iconic paintings, such as Resident Alien, through the lens of her personal trajectory, she places herself among and celebrates the people who arrived in California from both land and sea.

A statement on the sudden passing of Hung Liu.

As a young adult, Liu witnessed the destruction of a mosque in Dongsi, a subdistrict of Beijing, and her shock at hearing the official reports boldly lie about what had occurred greatly informed her desire to stand as a witness to history. Playing with the grand tradition of Chinese history painting, Liu recontextualizes historically sourced images in her paintings to explore history in its multiple iterations, examining the slippage between the primary sources, official sanctioned histories, and revisionist accounts. These mementos exist in varying conditions, having survived individual and institutional purges that erased any suggestion of anti–Communist Party activities. Her focus also includes groups of people who are routinely left out of grand historical narratives: prostitutes, peasants, victims of famine, and prisoners. Liu reaches into the past and recovers narratives that would have been otherwise forgotten.

Moving to San Diego in 1984, Liu began her graduate studies at the University of California, San Diego. After she began teaching at Mills College, Oakland, in 1992, Hung started heavily researching California history, noting differences in the way she had understood it as a child in China and as an adult citizen of the United States. Her exhibition Old Gold Mountain, held at the de Young in 1994, explored the history of Chinese American laborers in the United States by questioning the epistemology of history itself and its authorship. In Hung Liu: Great Granary by Wu Hung (2010) Liu asks, “What kind of thing is history? What kind of thing can bear witness to history? I had the sense that history had its one-sidedness and its mutability. Also history is a very subjective thing. What you choose to include and what you don’t—there’s absolutely no way you can encompass all the things you might.”

Working with the Oakland Museum of California, Liu recently explored the archive of photographer Dorothea Lange, which focused on documenting migrants during the Dust Bowl era of the twentieth century. Like Liu, Lange’s focus on the dispossessed creates a wellspring of compassion. According to Bransten’s Hung Liu: Promised Land (2017), “Statistics go right past us, but when we see the faces of the people who suffer it means so much more,” said Lange. Liu breathes life back into these faces through her interpretation of Lange’s work, interpreting the source compositions with dynamism and color.

The artist was inspired by migrants who, like herself, came to California and became an indelible part of its history, society, and culture. Liu’s personal history anchors Hung Liu: Golden Gate (金門), as the central wall of the installation features a massive reinterpretation of her work Resident Alien that first debuted at the Capp Street Project in 1989. Flanking the central piece, Liu’s art draws parallels between the journeys of the Americans who came from East Asia with those captured in the photography of Dorothea Lange.

Nampeyo and the Sikyátki Revival
Through February 26, 2023

Celebrating the artistic ingenuity of Nampeyo, famed Tewa-Hopi potter, the de Young museum presents an installation of 32 pots from the collections of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. During her lifetime, Nampeyo (ca. 1860–1942) was, and remains today, perhaps the most renowned potter from the American Southwest. The single-gallery exhibition highlights Nampeyo’s work, juxtaposed with examples of Hopi pottery from her time. Exquisite ceramics made by ancestral Hopi artists demonstrate Nampeyo’s sources of inspiration, and artworks by four generations of her descendants attest to the master potter’s enduring legacy.

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