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The Southeast Museum of Photography

The Southeast Museum of Photography
Daytona Beach, FL

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The Southeast Museum of Photography
1200 International Speedway Blvd.,
Daytona State College, Bld. 1200,
Daytona Beach , FL 32114
386-50-3894
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Lyonia Environmental Center
2150 Eustace Ave,
Deltona, Florida.
(386) 789-7207
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Museum1@DaytonaSate.edu


www.smponline.org
PRIMITIVE FLORIDA
TBD

Celebrating the Land ‘Where the Sawgrass Meets the Sky’

Featuring photographs by:
Jennifer Adler | Eric Clay | Benjamin Dimmitt | Paul Marcellini | Tessa Skiles | Mac Stone | Carlton Ward Jr.

Primitive Florida presents an alluring view of our state’s natural wonders–taking us on a visual journey through bottomland swamps, estuaries, coastal lowlands, pine flatwoods and freshwater springs. Through captivating photographs by Jennifer Adler, Eric Clay, Benjamin Dimmitt, Paul Marcellini, Tessa Skiles, Mac Stone and Carlton Ward Jr. we are offered a glimpse of true wilderness–a more primitive Florida–surprisingly hidden within plain sight.

MEET THE ARTISTS

How long do we have before the lure of unbridled development and rampant tourism– coupled with the effects of climate change–leave our state irrevocably compromised?

This question is for all Floridians–including the 900+ newcomers who arrive daily–and the importance of finding an answer cannot be overstated. Environmental degradation, loss of habitat and deforestation, pollution, and threats from non-native species are all simply a matter of fact. It is estimated that we lose about 20 acres of wild Florida every hour. It’s not just the wetlands that are disappearing: Florida has lost more than seven million acres of forest to development. It is up to us to determine how rapidly it will continue, and what the long term effects of our environmental policies will mean for the future. Florida’s population will only continue to expand, passing 21.5 million in 2020.

“For most of the wild things on earth, the future must depend on the conscience of mankind.
— Dr. Archie Carr

WHAT’S AT STAKE
Florida has over 1,200 miles of coastline, nearly 4,500 square miles of estuaries and bays, more than 6,700 square miles of other coastal waters, and an abundance of low lying topography. Its water follows a cyclical path in a constant state of flowing to and from within a vast network more extensive than in any other part of the country. In addition, most of the state’s 21 million residents live within 60 miles of the Atlantic Ocean or Gulf of Mexico.

Not surprisingly, natural resources drive the majority of Florida’s economy. Recreational activities–observation of wildlife, fishing, boating, hunting–and the seafood industry have a combined economic impact of $42.8 billion and create over 347,000 jobs. Florida also hosts over 100 million visitors a year, with many of them here to explore and enjoy the beauty of Florida’s wildlife and outdoors.

With Florida’s economy so closely tied to these natural resources, it seems mutually beneficial to restore freshwater and marine ecosystems, improve habitat for wildlife and enact policies to protect endangered species.

Florida’s coastal and marine resources comprise some of the nation’s most diverse and productive ecosystems, supporting vast numbers of aquatic and terrestrial animals and plants—some of which exist nowhere else on earth. These ecosystems include the coastal ocean, coral reefs, barrier islands, bays, estuaries, tidal salt marshes, creeks and mangrove swamps. Florida supports one of the largest numbers of carnivorous plant species, nearly one-half of the orchid species found in North America and the most fern species in the continental United States. The Florida Panhandle is considered one of the five richest biodiversity hotspots in North America. Unfortunately, more than 50 species of Florida’s wildlife are teetering on the brink of extinction, and many more are listed as imperiled or threatened. What’s to be done? Can we save these species before it’s too late?

“I am an optimist. I also believe that Floridians care about their environment. If they are educated about its perils, if they are never lied to, they will become stewards of the wild places that are left.”
— Marjorie Harris Carr, Environmental Activist

CONSERVATION THROUGH THE CAMERA LENS

The conservation movement has long recognized the importance of promoting a sense of connectivity between people and their environment. This connectivity fosters understanding and a sense of appreciation, and eventually spurs action to preserve these fragile areas from further harm. Contemplating nature within the frame of photography–specifically through the lenses of seven native Floridians – invites us to view this state through their eyes, and to understand the inherent beauty before us. For conservation-minded photographers, such as the ones presented in this exhibition, their art form becomes just as readily a platform–a means of saving the very subjects they photograph.

Primitive Florida presents an alluring view of our state’s natural wonders–taking us on a visual journey through bottomland swamps, estuaries, coastal lowlands, pine flatwoods and freshwater springs. Through captivating photographs by Jennifer Adler, Eric Clay, Benjamin Dimmitt, Paul Marcellini, Tessa Skiles, Mac Stone and Carlton Ward Jr. we are offered a glimpse of true wilderness–a more primitive Florida–surprisingly hidden within plain sight.


INTO THE WOODS

A SCIENTIFIC BREAKTHROUGH

WHAT LIES BENEATH


A NOTE FROM THE CURATOR:

The Florida of my childhood is gone, but not forgotten.

As Florida continues to feel the effects of climate change and population growth, it is imperative that conservation efforts remain at the forefront of our concern. We cannot afford to lose such precious resources, nor remain impartial to the situation unfolding before us. As storms grow stronger each year, as we lose tracts of land–acre by acre–at an exponential rate, and as species continue to become endangered, we are in jeopardy of sacrificing the very core of what makes up Florida’s character. The future of our state depends on our actions now–and we cannot wait. Taking the initiative to educate myself about restoration projects, and making a commitment to my local community means I’m taking steps in the right direction. I hope you’ll follow my example and check out these non-profit organizations/projects worthy of your time and consideration:

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