HOME INDEX EXHIBITIONS EVENTS ABOUT US BLOG LINKS CONTACT US SUBSCRIBE
Phoenix Art Museum
Phoenix, AZ
SUPPORT OUR ADVERTISERS. THEY MAKE THIS SITE POSSIBLE
Premium Ad Space

Phoenix Art Museum
1625 N. Central Avenue
Phoenix, AZ 85004-1685
(602) 257-1880
info@phxart.org
Map


www.phxart.org
Legends of Speed
November 3, 2019 through March 15, 2020

Legends of Speed will feature more than 20 iconic cars driven by Mario Andretti, A.J. Foyt, Stirling Moss, and others, and will include winners of 24 Hours of Le Mans and the Indianapolis 500

From November 3, 2019 through March 15, 2020, Phoenix Art Museum will present Legends of Speed , the Museum’s first major exhibition of racing cars. Legends of Speed will showcase an unprecedented selection of more than 20 cars spanning six decades and driven by some of the greatest drivers in the history of racing, such as A.J. Foyt, Mario Andretti, Dan Gurney, and Stirling Moss. The exhibition will include winners of 24 Hours of Le Mans, the Indianapolis 500, and the Italian Grand Prix, and featured marques will include Maserati, Ferrari, Mercedes-Benz, Alfa Romeo, Ford, and Bugatti. Phoenix Art Museum will be the sole venue for this landmark exhibition.

“We are very excited to bring this remarkable collection of racing cars to Phoenix Art Museum,” said Gilbert Vicario, the Museum’s Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs and the Selig Family Chief Curator. “Legends of Speed will enable our community to explore the artistry and design of these iconic cars, while learning about some of the greatest races and race car drivers in history. This exhibition is truly a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to experience many of the world’s most famous and successful race cars all in one place.”

Inspired by the success of the Museum’s 2007 Curves of Steel, the first art exhibition to explore the impact and influence of streamlining on American and European 20th-century automobile design, Legends of Speed will again bring a standout selection of historic cars to Phoenix, this time featuring legendary racing cars. The first of its kind in the Museum’s history, the exhibition, which will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue, will feature cars from the 1910s through the 1970s. All of the featured cars will be loaned to the Museum by internationally recognized collectors and automotive museums from across the United States and Arizona, including Melani and Rob Walton and the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum. Highlights will include A.J. Foyt’s first Indianapolis 500 winner, loaned to the Museum by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum, and Mario Andretti’s Formula-One championship winner, a 1977 Lotus 79. Arizona audiences will also have the opportunity to view a Ford GT 40 that won the renowned 24 Hours of Le Mans in France twice, first in 1968 when it was driven by Pedro Rodriguez and Lucien Bianchi, and again in 1969 when it was driven by Jacky Ickx and Jackie Oliver.

In addition to modern racing cars, Legends of Speed will present a number of cars engineered prior to World War II, including the original 1911 Franklin driven by Ralph Hamlin in the 1910 Desert Classic, also known as the “Cactus Derby.” The off-road race from Los Angeles to Phoenix predated the modern interstate highway, and Hamlin’s Franklin came in second place, surviving the 500-mile journey across rugged desert terrain. The exhibition will also feature a 1929 Bugatti Type 35 driven by Hellé Nice, colloquially known as “The Bugatti Queen.” Nice, whose real name was Helene Delangle, was the first Women’s Grand Prix winner and is considered the fastest woman racing professional prior to World War II.

About the Exhibition
Legends of Speed will be on view from November 2, 2019 through March 15, 2020 in Steele Gallery. Legends of Speed is organized by Phoenix Art Museum. It is made possible through the generosity of Melani and Rob Walton, through The Rob and Melani Walton Foundation, Susan and Carter Emerson, Carl & Marilynn Thoma Art Foundation, Joan Cremin Exhibition Endowment, Laurie and Budd Florkiewicz, Jackson Family Foundation, APS, and OUTFRONT MEDIA. Additional support is provided by Sonia and John Breslow, Nancy and Najeeb Kahn, Del and Sharron Lewis, and narrativeTM. It is also made possible through the generosity of the Museum's Circles of Support and Museum Members.

Legends of Speed will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue. For more details about the exhibition, please visit phxart.org.

PhxArt60: The Past Decade
Through January 26, 2020

Between 2009 and 2019, the permanent collection of Phoenix Art Museum has experienced incredible growth. This exhibition showcases select works of art acquired ten years after the Museum’s 50th anniversary. The Past Decade demonstrates the Museum’s firm commitment to diversity and artistic excellence through a careful selection of works from the departments of modern and contemporary art, Latin American art, American art, Asian art, and fashion design.

Of particular note is the Museum’s recent decision to acquire historic photographic works that complement our permanent collections. In this installation, we celebrate the artistic genius of Aaron Siskind, Harry Callahan, and Bruce Davidson, photographic masters whose work remains relevant to this day. Furthermore, the arrangement of art works in The Past Decade opens up the possibility for interdepartmental conversations to emerge as a way of engaging a contemporary, globalized view of visual culture.


PhxArt60: La década pasada
Entre 2009 y 2019, la colección permanente de Phoenix Art Museum (el Museo de Arte de Phoenix) ha experimentado un increíble crecimiento. Esta exposición muestra obras de arte adquiridas después del 50 aniversario del Museo. La década pasada demuestra el firme compromiso del Museo con la diversidad y la excelencia artística a través de una cuidadosa selección de obras de los departamentos de arte moderno y contemporáneo, arte latinoamericano, arte norteamericano, arte asiático y el diseño de moda.

De particular interés es la reciente decisión del Museo de adquirir obras fotográficas históricas que complementan nuestras colecciones permanentes. En esta instalación, celebramos el genio artístico de Aaron Siskind, Harry Callahan y Bruce Davidson, maestros de fotografía cuyos trabajos siguen siendo relevante hoy en día. La disposición de las obras de arte en La década pasada además abre a la posibilidad para conversaciones interdepartamentales como una forma de involucrar una visión contemporánea y globalizada hacia la cultura visual.Legends of Speed will feature more than 20 iconic cars driven by Mario Andretti, A.J. Foyt, Stirling Moss, and others, and will include winners of 24 Hours of Le Mans and the Indianapolis 500

GURU NANAK: 550th BIRTH ANNIVERSARY OF SIKHISM’S FOUNDER
August 17, 2019 - March 20, 2020
Art of Asia galleries: Khanuja Family Sikh Heritage Gallery

At the very foundation of Sikhism is the recognition that God is One; an eternal and all-pervasive unity; which was a radical concept in medieval Indian society. The second tenet is that all Creation is equal, without distinction by caste, creed, gender or station in life. In the words of its founder Guru Nanak, “I see no stranger.” The First Guru, Guru Nanak (1469-1539), was a learned man, a philosopher and poet, yet his message was clear and plain and meant for everyone. The Divine is found through humility, service and an affirmation of beauty and joy in everyday life. The Sikh path to the Divine is dwelling upon his name in communal hymns, searching for truth within ourselves, earning an honest living, sharing with those in need, and caring for one’s family.

JANAM SAKHI
Janam Sakhi refers to literature related exclusively to the life and teachings of Guru Nanak. According to scholarly research on Janam Sakhi, they are neither hagiographies nor biographies. However, careful appraisal of them reveal that the compilers of these texts strove to lend authenticity and historical credibility to the anecdotes by inserting quotations from the hymns of Guru Nanak and his successors as enshrined in the Sikh scriptures or Guru Granth Sahib. Many of these attest to his wise words and poetic nature as well as miraculous happenings and visions. During his lifetime, Guru Nanak traveled an estimated 20,000 miles on four trips to many parts of Asia and the Middle East. His experiences influenced the formation of his religious principles. Depictions of these stories are meant to be instructional rather than devotional.From November 3, 2019 through March 15, 2020, Phoenix Art Museum will present Legends of Speed , the Museum’s first major exhibition of racing cars. Legends of Speed will showcase an unprecedented selection of more than 20 cars spanning six decades and driven by some of the greatest drivers in the history of racing, such as A.J. Foyt, Mario Andretti, Dan Gurney, and Stirling Moss. The exhibition will include winners of 24 Hours of Le Mans, the Indianapolis 500, and the Italian Grand Prix, and featured marques will include Maserati, Ferrari, Mercedes-Benz, Alfa Romeo, Ford, and Bugatti. Phoenix Art Museum will be the sole venue for this landmark exhibition.

Crickets, Tea, and Snuff: Chinese Intellectual Pursuits
Through March 29, 2020
Art of Asia galleries

In traditional China, the literati, or educated class, set the standards for aesthetic taste and leisurely pursuits, many of which are still practiced today. Through a diverse selection of objects, this exhibition introduces viewers to a number of these preferences and interests.

Crickets were the ideal pet for members of the Chinese upper classes and imperial court because of their soothing sound and their ability to be transported in elegant, portable cages. Viewers will have the opportunity to examine various gourd cricket cages donated to the Museum by Amy S. Clague.

The beverage of connoisseurs in China and still widely consumed today, tea is considered beneficial, stimulating the mind, cleansing the blood, and aiding in digestion. As a result, tea vessels hold a special significance. For centuries, the town of Yixing was known as the central producer of unglazed teawares, and a collection of Yixing teawares, donated to the Museum by James T. Bialac, is showcased in the exhibition.

The practice of inhaling snuff, or aromatic tobacco ground into a fine powder, for a jolt of nicotine originated in the Americas but took hold in China during the 17th century. Made of stone, porcelain, lacquer, and other materials, snuff bottles were symbols of status, wealth, and taste in China. The exhibition features a selection of Chinese snuff bottles, donated to the Museum by Deborah G. Carstens.

Crickets, Tea, and Snuff: Chinese Intellectual Pursuits is organized by Phoenix Art Museum. It is made possible through the generosity of Amy S. Clague, James T. Bialac, Deborah G. Carstens, and donors to the Museum’s annual fund.“We are very excited to bring this remarkable collection of racing cars to Phoenix Art Museum,” said Gilbert Vicario, the Museum’s Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs and the Selig Family Chief Curator. “Legends of Speed will enable our community to explore the artistry and design of these iconic cars, while learning about some of the greatest races and race car drivers in history. This exhibition is truly a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to experience many of the world’s most famous and successful race cars all in one place.”

SILK & JADE: CHINESE ARISTOCRATIC TREASURES
August 3 – November 17, 2019
Coleman & Way Gallery

Silk was first developed in ancient China. The earliest example of silk has been found in tombs at a Neolithic site and dates back 8,500 years. Legend gives credit for developing silk to a Chinese empress. Silks were originally reserved for the emperors of China for their own use and gifts to others, but spread gradually through trade both geographically and socially to many regions of Asia and the rest of the world. Because of its texture and luster, silk rapidly became a popular luxury fabric in the many areas accessible to Chinese merchants. In addition to being used to make clothes and other textiles, silk was also used for traditional paintings.

Jade refers to an ornamental mineral, mostly known for its green varieties. It can refer to either of two different minerals: nephrite, a silicate of calcium and magnesium, or jadeite, a silicate of sodium and aluminium. Nephrite jade has been mined and worked in China since Neolithic times. Jade was used to create many utilitarian and ceremonial objects, from indoor decorative items to jade burial suits. “Anciently superior men found the likeness of all excellent qualities in jade. Soft, smooth, glossy, it appeared to them like benevolence; fine, compact, and strong, like intelligence; angular but not sharp and cutting, like righteousness; its flaws not concealing its beauty, nor its beauty concealing its flaws, like loyalty.” In these words the sage Confucius captured how the Chinese have felt about jade for thousands of years.Inspired by the success of the Museum’s 2007 Curves of Steel, the first art exhibition to explore the impact and influence of streamlining on American and European 20th-century automobile design, Legends of Speed will again bring a standout selection of historic cars to Phoenix, this time featuring legendary racing cars. The first of its kind in the Museum’s history, the exhibition, which will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue, will feature cars from the 1910s through the 1970s. All of the featured cars will be loaned to the Museum by internationally recognized collectors and automotive museums from across the United States and Arizona, including Melani and Rob Walton and the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum. Highlights will include A.J. Foyt’s first Indianapolis 500 winner, loaned to the Museum by the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum, and Mario Andretti’s Formula-One championship winner, a 1977 Lotus 79. Arizona audiences will also have the opportunity to view a Ford GT 40 that won the renowned 24 Hours of Le Mans in France twice, first in 1968 when it was driven by Pedro Rodriguez and Lucien Bianchi, and again in 1969 when it was driven by Jacky Ickx and Jackie Oliver.
The Timeless Landscape: Recent Gifts from the Papp Family
August 10 – November 17, 2019
Marilyn and L. Roy Papp Family Gallery

Classical Chinese ink paintings traditionally focused on the beauty of the natural world, depicting insects, birds, flowers, and fruit, or trees, clouds, and mountains on paper or silk. Featuring gifts from The Papp Family Foundation, this exhibition showcases large hanging scrolls, horizontal scrolls, and album leaves distinguished by their structured ink brushstrokes and soft touches of color. Complementing these paintings are examples of classical Chinese ceramics donated by Gail and Stephen Rineberg.

The Timeless Landscape: Recent Gifts from the Papp Family is organized by Phoenix Art Museum. It is made possible through the generosity of The Papp Family Foundation, Gail and Stephen Rineberg, and donors to the Museum’s annual fund.In addition to modern racing cars, Legends of Speed will present a number of cars engineered prior to World War II, including the original 1911 Franklin driven by Ralph Hamlin in the 1910 Desert Classic, also known as the “Cactus Derby.” The off-road race from Los Angeles to Phoenix predated the modern interstate highway, and Hamlin’s Franklin came in second place, surviving the 500-mile journey across rugged desert terrain. The exhibition will also feature a 1929 Bugatti Type 35 driven by Hellé Nice, colloquially known as “The Bugatti Queen.” Nice, whose real name was Helene Delangle, was the first Women’s Grand Prix winner and is considered the fastest woman racing professional prior to World War II.
Clay And Bamboo: Japanese Ceramics and Flower Baskets
August 10, 2019 – March 29, 2020
Art of Asia galleries

Featuring recent loans and gifts from Carol and Jeffrey Horvitz and Sanford and Beth Hoffman, this exhibition of contemporary Japanese ceramics examines how artists transcend functionality, gender, and material to create pieces that are modern yet rooted in tradition. Examples of basketry used for ikebana floral arrangements are also showcased and share a similar rustic and natural aesthetic.

Clay and Bamboo: Japanese Ceramics and Flower Baskets is organized by Phoenix Art Museum. It is made possible through the generosity of Carol and Jeffrey Horvitz, Sanford and Beth Hoffman, and donors to the Museum’s annual fund.About the Exhibition
Transcendent Transcendentalists
March 30 - December 15, 2019
North Wing, American Galleries

Transcendent Transcendentalists features abstract works by American modernists Raymond Jonson (1891–1982), Emil Bisttram (1895–1976), and Stuart Walker (1904–1940), all of whom were members of the Transcendental Painting Group (TPG). Founded in 1938 by Jonson, the short-lived collective of artists promoted abstract, non-representational painting that explored the connection between art, spirituality, and the metaphysical world. Members of the TPG included Agnes Pelton (1881–1961), Lawren Harris (1885–1970), and Florence Miller Pierce (1918–2007), among others.

Transcendent Transcendentalists showcases 14 paintings by Jonson, Bisttram, and Walker from the Museum’s American art collection, along with 12 airbrushed watercolor paintings by Jonson never before exhibited in an art museum and on temporary loan from March 30 through July 7, 2019, from the Collection of Ronald and Maxine Linde. The installation explores how the three Transcendentalists experimented with space, light, and design in an effort to reach, depict, and guide viewers to higher planes of spirituality through abstract works. The installation complements and offers additional context for the upcoming special-engagement exhibition Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist.

Transcendent Transcendentalists is organized by Phoenix Art Museum. It is made possible through the support of the Henry Luce Foundation.Legends of Speed will be on view from November 2, 2019 through March 15, 2020 in Steele Gallery. Legends of Speed is organized by Phoenix Art Museum. It is made possible through the generosity of Melani and Rob Walton, through The Rob and Melani Walton Foundation, Susan and Carter Emerson, Carl & Marilynn Thoma Art Foundation, Joan Cremin Exhibition Endowment, Laurie and Budd Florkiewicz, Jackson Family Foundation, APS, and OUTFRONT MEDIA. Additional support is provided by Sonia and John Breslow, Nancy and Najeeb Kahn, Del and Sharron Lewis, and narrativeTM. It is also made possible through the generosity of the Museum's Circles of Support and Museum Members.
Mexican Photographers, Mexican Views
Through September 22, 2019
Doris and John Norton Gallery for the Center for Creative Photography

Mexican Photographers, Mexican Views features more than 60 photographs created solely by Mexican artists that offer an intimate view into 20th-century Mexico and the country’s shifting national identity.

The exhibition, with works drawn exclusively from the collection of the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, showcases a range of photographic techniques used in 20th-century Mexican photography and includes pastoral landscapes, portraits of indigenous peoples, and images of everyday rural life. Featured photographers include Hugo Brehme (1882–1954), Lola Álvarez Bravo (1903–1993), and Manuel Álvarez Bravo (1902–2002), among others.

Mexican Photographers, Mexican Views is organized by Phoenix Art Museum and the Center for Creative Photography. It is made possible through the generosity of donors to the Museum’s annual fund.Legends of Speed will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue. For more details about the exhibition, please visit phxart.org.

Special Installation: Philip C. Curtis and the Landscapes of Arizona
Through November 15, 2020
North Wing

Landscape remains one of the most popular subjects for artists visiting and residing in Arizona. Philip C. Curtis, while not known as a landscape painter, draws extensively on that subject. Curtis came to the state in 1937 to establish the Phoenix Federal Art Center under the Federal Art Project, a New Deal program. He left two years later to head a similar facility in Des Moines, Iowa, but returned to Arizona in 1947. Settling in Scottsdale, he painted surreal compositions, with figures in Victorian costumes set in the desert. Arizona’s landscapes were a rich source of inspiration for him, and while his canvases do not portray any recognizable geological features, his work may be contextualized within the work of a broad spectrum of artists who came to the state. Curtis saw the desert through a lens of magic realism. This differed from Maxfield Parrish, Eugene Berman, and other artists who preferred more representational modes.

Special Installation: Sublime Landscapes
Through October 6, 2019
North Wing

Spurred by the artists from the North East who comprised the Hudson River School, landscape painting was one of the most popular subjects in nineteenth-century America. Pushed ever westward by expansionist notions of Manifest Destiny, a belief that such territorial expansion was inevitable and pre-ordained. Painters were also part of government initiatives to survey the vast region, particularly in regards to potential railroad routes and to learn about the indigenous populations they encountered.

Adventurous artists sought landscape subjects beyond the continental United States, some traveling to the Arctic, where they found immense icebergs and the Aurora Borealis (these were dangerous journeys). Artists visited equatorial South America where they thrilled to the sublime vistas and smoldering volcanos they discovered. The Amazon and the Andes were rich sources for exotic paintings. Many regarded South America as “a land of scientific wonders, golden riches, and edenic innocence.” J.P. Reichardt’s Latin American Scene of 1866 captures the attraction of humid locales very different from North America.

Special Installation: Western Art Associates: Celebrating 50 Years
Through October 15, 2020
North Wing

Western Art Associates, established in 1968 as a support group of Phoenix Art Museum, has generously made possible the acquisition of fifty-three works for the Museum’s collection, all on display in Celebrating 50 Years. Its impetus was the purchase of Pink Abstraction (1929) by Georgia O’Keeffe, which prompted several influential Phoenicians to observe that if the museum had wanted a painting by this artist, it should have been one of her Western paintings.

The focus of the group has been the historical and contemporary art of the Western United States portraying cowboys, American Indians, and landscape. Their first purchase was Maynard Dixon’s Watchers from the Housetops in 1973. Thereafter, the group made possible the acquisition of significant works for the Museum’s collection nearly every year. Most recent is the 50th Anniversary purchase of Emil Bisttram’s stunning Ranchos de Taos Church (in partnership with Men’s Arts Council). Members of Western Art Associates had a strong interest in contemporary Western art, and for 37 years, between 1973 and 2010 were involved with the annual exhibition and sale of the Cowboy Artists of America, founded in Sedona in 1965.

previous museum
next
museum
Advertise
Support Your Local Galleries and Museums! They Are Economic Engines for Your Community.

Subscribe to Our Free Weekly Email Newsletter!

ADVERTISE ON THIS SITE | HOME | EXHIBITIONS | INDEX | EVENTS | ABOUT US | LINKS | CONTACT US | DONATE | SUBSCRIBE
Copyright 2019 Art Museum Touring.com