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Palm Springs Art Museum
Palm Springs Art Museum
Palm Springs, CA
Palm Springs Art Museum in Palm Desert, The Galen and the Faye Sarkowsky Sculpture Garden,
Palm Desert, CA
Palm Springs Art Museum
Architecture and Design Center, Edwards Harris Pavilion, Palm Springs, CA


Palm Springs Art Museum
Located in downtown Palm Springs on Museum Drive at Tahquitz Canyon Way, just west of N. Palm Canyon Drive
101 Museum Drive
Palm Springs, CA 92262-5659
760-322-4800
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Palm Springs Art Museum in Palm Desert, The Galen and the Faye Sarkowsky Sculpture Garden
Located at Entrada del Paseo at the westernmost intersection of Highway 111 and El Paseo
72-567 Highway 111
Palm Desert, CA 92260
760-346-5600
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Palm Springs Art Museum Architecture and Design Center, Edwards Harris Pavilion
300 South Palm Canyon Dr.
Palm Springs
760-322-4897
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Email: info@psmuseum.org


www.psmuseum.org

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Exhbitions:

Storm of Hope: Law & Disorder

Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist

Agnes Pelton Landscapes

Helen Lundeberg

John Divola: Zuma Series

Pure, Simple, and Beautiful Forms: Glass from the Collection

American Roads


Events


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Storm of Hope: Law & Disorder
June 26, 2021 - Feb,, 2022
Palm Springs Art Museum

Watch a video on Robert Longo courtesy of the Artist Profile Archive.

Robert Longo focuses our attention on images familiar to us and transforms them into large-scale drawings in charcoal to create what he calls “the perfect image.” His visual language developed out of an acknowledgment of and reverence for media images—what the artist refers to as “the image storm” that surrounds us. Since the 1980s, Longo has been associated with the Pictures Generation, a group of artists who understood images as neither neutral nor objective but rather with an inherent point of view that could be uncovered, revealed, and deployed as a form of critique and beauty.

Central to the exhibition are Longo’s monumental works representing the three branches of the US government: the Capitol, the Supreme Court, and the White House. Each source image is marked by a critical moment in recent U.S. history—respectively, the presidency of Barack Obama, disputed nominations to the Supreme Court, and the presidency of Donald Trump—and serve as references for key points in contemporary history. Also included in the exhibition are four large-scale works that refer to issues of environmental reform, the representation of history through its monuments, the perils faced by immigrants, and the fragility of the free press. The political aspects of Longo’s work have become increasingly pointed in recent years—with focus on power, justice, and humanity, through the perspective of rage and urgency.

Longo’s practice begins with identifying a subject of interest and then searching for images in the media or by photographing them himself, which he then studies, adjusts, transforms, and reimagines. Although Longo’s images are so hyperrealistic that they are often mistaken for photographs, they could never exist as such. Each work of art is the result of months of labor-intensive processes to plan, alter, perfect, and then execute. However, the results are closer to history paintings, not only in their massive scale—mounted on paper seamed together to total, in some cases, 12 feet tall—but also in their weighty subjects.

This exhibition is organized by Chief Curator Rochelle Steiner.

Support is provided by Steven A. Brown & Richard M. Cain, Diane Klein & Veronica M. Fernandez, and Roswitha Kima Smale.

Additional support is provided by Metro Pictures, New York, and Jeffrey Deitch.

In-kind support provided by The Art Collective.

This season’s exhibitions are sponsored by the Herman & Faye Sarkowsky Charitable Foundation.

Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist
Through September 6, 2021
Palm Springs Art Museum

The first major exhibition of the under-recognized American modernist painter who worked in Cathedral City since the exhibition at Palm Springs Desert Museum in 1995. Although she painted conventional landscapes and portraits, Pelton (1881–1961) is most celebrated for her abstract compositions that reflect her interest in esoteric subjects and occult philosophies, including numerology and Agni Yoga with its principal focus on fire as a guiding force.

This exhibition was organized by Phoenix Art Museum and curated by Gilbert Vicario, The Selig Family Chief Curator. The Palm Springs presentation is organized by Rochelle Steiner, Chief Curator & Director of Public Programs and Education. Lead support is provided by the Mary Ingebrand-Pohlad Foundation and Pamela & James Muzzy. Generous support is provided by Vicki & Bill Hood and Yvonne & Steve Maloney. Additional Support is provided by Nora & Guy Barron and The Sam and Diane Stewart Family Foundation

Agnes Pelton Landscapes
Through September 6, 2021
Palm Springs Art Museum

Though Agnes Pelton is best known for her spiritual abstract paintings, during her thirty years residing near Palm Springs she also painted desert landscapes. She viewed these two styles as complimentary forms of expression that informed one another. This exhibition showcases landscape and floral paintings and pastel drawings from the museum’s permanent collection and local private collectors.

This exhibition was organized by Palm Springs Art Museum and curated by Christine Giles, Curator. Support is provided by Joann Gray & Sheldon Harmatz.

Helen Lundeberg
Through Summer 2021
Palm Springs Art Museum

Helen Lundeberg (1908-1999), Karl Benjamin, Lorser Feitelson, Frederick Hammersley, and John McLaughlin are considered among the Hard-Edge abstractionists who worked in the mid-century in Southern California. Whereas artists on the East Coast predominately explored gestural and expressive styles in the 1950s, these West Coast artists produced cool and crisp compositions with defined forms and a smooth finish. Palm Springs Art Museum is fortunate to have nine art works by Lundeberg in its collection, and these are joined in this special exhibition by a loan from a local collector.

This exhibition is organized by Rochelle Steiner, Chief Curator & Director of Public Programs and Education.

John Divola: Zuma Series
April 1, 2021 - Summer 2021
Palm Springs Art Museum

In the late seventies, John Divola (American, born 1949) stumbled upon an abandoned property in Zuma Beach in Southern California. Between 1977-1978, he observed, augmented, and photographed this building, and it is the subject of one of his earliest and most renowned projects entitled Zuma, 1979. The structure was repeatedly burned and damaged in various ways by the fire department who utilized it for training exercises and practice drills. Divola himself also made additions of paint and graffiti, and these marks were augmented by others’ vandalism, decay from natural elements, and the passage of time.

This exhibition is organized by Rochelle Steiner, Chief Curator & Director of Public Programs and Education

Pure, Simple, and Beautiful Forms: Glass from the Collection
April 1, 2021 - Summer 2021

Drawn from Palm Springs Art Museum’s permanent collection, which includes major gifts of glass artworks from David Kaplan and Glenn Ostergaard, Pure, Simple, and Beautiful Forms features pieces by artists from the United States and abroad. At a time when we are confronted by tumultuous global issues that challenge the sustainability of the planet, this exhibition examines essential universal qualities of beauty, purity, and simplicity as created by artists working in glass.

This exhibition, on view in the Kaplan-Ostergaard Glass Center, is curated by Katherine Hough, who retired as Chief Curator at Palm Springs Art Museum in 2018, after holding many positions at the museum during her 43-year tenure.

Generous support is provided by Angie Gerber and Deborah & Kenneth Novack

American Roads
Through Summer 2021
Palm Springs Art Museum

This special portfolio of photographs, published in 1981 by Victor Landweber and the Artists in an edition of 100 boxed sets of original prints, captures unique scenes that express a love affair with, and dependence upon, this country’s major highways and local roads. Photographed between 1968 and 1982, these images vary in technique and approach. Some of them record unusual events seen along highways; others focus on anonymous features that make all of our roads look alike.

This exhibition is organized by Rochelle Steiner, Chief Curator & Director of Public Programs and Education.

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