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Missoula Art Muawum Missoula Art Museum
Missoula, MT


Missoula Art Museum
MAM
335 North Pattee
Missoula, MT 59802
406.728.0447

missoulaartmuseum.org

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Robert Harrison: It Takes A Village
Through October 15 2021

Robert Harrison is at the forefront of radical change in the ceramic community. Author of Sustainable Ceramics: A Practical Guide and leading the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts Green Committee, Harrison challenges the medium’s extractive history and encourages its long-term sustainability.

Harrison is internationally known for his large-scale, site-specific architectural sculpture. For the Missoula Art Park, Harrison will exhibit site-specific wire-mesh house structures that continue his exploration of his architecturally based work. The concept for his installation juxtaposes and stacks small and large iconic house forms with human scale and bright colors. Harrison invited the Missoula community to contribute material—brick, stone, porcelain—to fill the interior space. The accumulation of house forms suggests a community, giving voice to the adage that celebrates collective action.

Harrison has served as President of the Boards of both the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts and the Archie Bray Foundation for the Ceramic Arts. He was awarded the Meloy Stevenson Award of Excellence from the Bray in 2008. He has been elected to the International Academy of Ceramics based in Geneva, Switzerland (2001), the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts (2007), and was a founding member of the World Association of Brick Artists (2010). In 2019, he was awarded the Artist Innovation Award by the Montana Arts Council.

Special thank you to exhibition sponsor Timothy Gordon Appraisals and Caras Nursery.

Edge Of The Abyss
Through October 9 2021

This summer, MAM is participating in EXTRACTION: Art on the Edge of the Abyss, a special project of the CODEX Foundation. It aims to produce a multimedia and multivenue art experience that investigates extractive industry in all its forms. With sites stretching throughout the United States and abroad, MAM is part of an organic collective of participating artists, art venues, curators, and arts supporters.

Contemporary artists living and working throughout the region have a history of making creative works and actions in response to the largest open-pit mine in Montana: the Berkeley Pit in Butte. Jean Arnold, Eben Goff, Kristi Hager, Marcy James, Peter R. Koch in collaboration with Didier Mutel, and Nolan Salix present a dynamic range of perspectives in reaction to this undeniable feature of the Western landscape and psyche—from awe at the grandeur of landscape to concerns about land use and environmental impact.

Peter R. Koch of the CODEX Foundation explains the origins of the Extraction: Art on the Edge of the Abyss: "I know about [mining and fragmented communities] because I experienced first-hand the toxic waste from what was, at the time, the world’s largest underground, and later, open-pit copper mine flowing down the Clark’s Fork of the Columbia River through Missoula, my hometown, each spring depositing layers of toxic mud behind the Milltown Dam. We were told never to eat fish caught in the river. Being an avid fisherman and an aspiring aquatic biologist, I deeply resented the entire industry and its apologists...[the aim] of Extraction Art is to develop an atrocity exhibition that documents the destruction brought by copper and timber extraction in Western Montana [and the] exploitation of the Bakken Formation—the deposits of coal, oil, and natural gas that spread across Montana, North and South Dakota, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Wyoming."

The Space Of Hope: A Collective Response
Through September 18, 2021

This summer, MAM is participating in EXTRACTION: Art on the Edge of the Abyss, a special project of the CODEX Foundation. It aims to produce a multimedia and multivenue art intervention, which investigates extractive industry (any process or businesses associated with removing materials and natural resources from the earth) in all forms. Examples include coal mining, oil drilling, commercial fishing, deforestation, and more. With sites stretching throughout the United States and abroad, MAM is part of an organic collective of participating artists, art venues, curators, and arts supporters. This exhibition overlaps with other extraction-based shows at MAM this summer: Pennies from Hell: Selections from the MAM Collection, Edge of the Abyss: Artists Picturing the Berkeley Pit, and Jerry Rankin: Golden Sunlight.

The title of this exhibition is taken from a quote by American author Rebecca Solnit: “We don’t know what is going to happen, or how, or when, and that very uncertainty is the space of hope.” Rather than focus on the devastation wrought by the intertwined processes of industrialization, extraction, climate change, cultural displacement, and colonization, this juried group exhibition will imagine solutions and amplify voices that serve as a counter-narrative to the historical power structures that are inherent with extraction.

MAM invited feminist approaches, Indigenous voices, and underrepresented viewpoints through an open submission process. 13 artists (12 women, one man) were then chosen as their works represented new aspects of healing, reparations, nurturing, cooperation, unity, and problem-solving as a global society. MAM is grateful for project support from the Cultural Vision Fund.

Through September 18, 2021

This summer, MAM is participating in EXTRACTION: Art on the Edge of the Abyss, a special project of the CODEX Foundation. It aims to produce a multimedia and multivenue art intervention, which investigates extractive industry (any process or businesses associated with removing materials and natural resources from the earth) in all forms. Examples include coal mining, oil drilling, commercial fishing, deforestation, and more. With sites stretching throughout the United States and abroad, MAM is part of an organic collective of participating artists, art venues, curators, and arts supporters. This exhibition overlaps with other extraction-based shows at MAM this summer: Pennies from Hell: Selections from the MAM Collection, Edge of the Abyss: Artists Picturing the Berkeley Pit, and Jerry Rankin: Golden Sunlight.

The title of this exhibition is taken from a quote by American author Rebecca Solnit: “We don’t know what is going to happen, or how, or when, and that very uncertainty is the space of hope.” Rather than focus on the devastation wrought by the intertwined processes of industrialization, extraction, climate change, cultural displacement, and colonization, this juried group exhibition will imagine solutions and amplify voices that serve as a counter-narrative to the historical power structures that are inherent with extraction.

MAM invited feminist approaches, Indigenous voices, and underrepresented viewpoints through an open submission process. 13 artists (12 women, one man) were then chosen as their works represented new aspects of healing, reparations, nurturing, cooperation, unity, and problem-solving as a global society. MAM is grateful for project support from the Cultural Vision Fund.

Pennies From Hell
Through September 2 2021

Selections from the MAM Collection

Included are featured pieces from the MAM Collection which focus on the effects of extraction, including George Gogas’ enigmatic painting M-M Cocktail: Ingredients: 1 Part Missoula Air, 1 Part Milltown Water which refers to the inversion pollution in the Missoula Valley, coupled with the problematic legacy of Milltown, a blue-collar community which lies seven miles to the east of Missoula. The Milltown Dam at the confluence of the Clark Fork and Blackfoot rivers historically aided timber extraction and the nearby sawmill. The dam, downstream from the open-pit mines of Butte and the smelter in Anaconda, retained mine waste laden with heavy metals from the Clark Fork River and was declared a Superfund site, resulting in years of remediation.

Also included in the exhibition are photographer Mark Abrahamson’s vibrant semi-abstract aerial views in the Montana Legacy Suite, such as tailings, settling ponds, and Superfund sites, Gennie DeWeese’s iconic rendering of Montana clear cuts using cattle markers, Edgar Smith’s stunning landscape painting contrasting the Berkeley Pit to the grandeur of the Grand Canyon, Susan Barnes’ hand-painted photographs of impacted sites and communities, and drawings of the Hanford nuclear site in eastern Washington, whose fallout has moved on downwind through air currents and aquifers to Montana by Karen Rice.

The title of this show is borrowed from an article by the late Edwin "Ed" Dobb, who wrote extensively about the effects of the Berkeley Pit on his hometown of Butte. Click here to read Pennies from Hell: In Montana, the Bill for Copper Comes Due from 1996. Dobb, along with CODEX Foundation director Peter R. Koch, conceived of the Extraction project but Dobb passed away before he could see it be completed.

Jerry Rankin: Golden Sunlight
Through September 2 2021

Rankin’s newest print series focuses on the environmental threats posed by the Golden Sunlight Mine near his home in Whitehall, Montana. The mine opened in 1982 and briefly shuttered in 2019 when gold production was not economically viable. It recently re-opened and will soon begin to pre-process the tailings, or material left over from mining. Rankin’s artistic project began in 2015 as a series of drawings depicting the expansion of the mine and now features seven collagraph prints.

"Within each block or panel of the exhibit I’ve illustrated the progressive vandalized and irreparable landscape, the increasingly toxic waste pond lake, and the chewing and tearing at the seams of the earth caused by rock removal; the devastation occurring without consequence, without imagination. Centered in an earthquake zone, a four-point quake could easily slide the entire poisonous mass down the mountain and into the Jefferson River, a stream feeding first into the blue ribbon fishing waters of the Madison and Gallatin Rivers and joining the Missouri within a few miles. Points of stress are indicted by magenta symbols. The waste pond lake is shown in acidic layers of virulent greens and reds. The increasing network of lines throughout might represent an EKG map of the circulation system of the mountain. The work is another response to the dangers that Montana’s industrial climate poses to the entire range of ecological systems." —Jerry Rankin

This exhibition is touring the state under the auspices of the Montana Art Gallery Directors Association (MAGDA).

Jerry Rankin is one of Montana’s most significant living artists. He was mentored by two of the titans in Montana’s early Modernist art movement: Rudy Autio in high school and Robert DeWeese at Montana State University. He went on to earn his MFA in printmaking from the University of Montana. During his decades-long career as an artist, Rankin has developed a distinct visual language and his endless curiosity and investigation of the natural world through his studio practice continues today. Rankin’s images are reflections on the landscape around him, as he sees it. He stated, “In 2015 I began a series of drawings, which I developed into prints exploring the expansion of the Golden Sunlight mine near Whitehall, Montana.”

Rankin was born in Ohio and raised in Bozeman, Montana. His father was an engineer on the Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park, and Jerry spent summers as a young boy living in a tent in the park. Rankin spent the better part of his professional career as an artist-educator, teaching in Alaska and Washington before returning to Montana to be a high school art teacher in Great Falls and Bozeman.

Sean Chandler: New Works
Through August 14 2021

Sean Chandler: The One Defined To Be No One

The exhibition is Sean Chandler’s first solo exhibition in Montana and the first significant exhibition in recent years. The exhibition will be featured in The Lynda M. Frost Gallery of Contemporary American Indian Art, a space dedicated to perpetually exhibiting contemporary Native artists. A catalog of his work is forthcoming.

Chandler (Aaniiih, born 1971) put his promising artistic career on hold to respond to a need for leadership in his community. He grew up in Glendive, Montana, and his family was among the only Native family in the community. He received his BA in Art and MA in Native Studies at Montana State University in Bozeman. He later earned an Ed.D. in Educational Leadership from the University of Montana while employed as Director of American Indian Studies at Aaniiih Nakoda College on Fort Belknap Agency in Harlem, Montana. Recently, he was promoted to president of the College in August 2020. After nearly a 12 year hiatus, Chandler returned to creating art in 2018 and joined the artist collective Paintallica. His pieces range from oil, acrylic, paint stick, and charcoal on large canvases to drypoint prints and drawings. His work infuses experiences from his childhood in eastern Montana, including his love of Major League Baseball, and the history of Native assimilation into white culture, as well as teachings from his father. His father, Al Chandler, attended Indian Residential Schools near Pierre, South Dakota, and was later the focus of a PBS documentary short called I'd Rather Be Powwowing, which debuted in 1983. He cites Blackfeet artist Ernie Pepion (1943–2005), Salish Kootenai artist Corwin Clairmont, and Bozeman-based artist Jay Schmidt as mentors.

He has received awards and exhibited at the Heard Museum in Phoenix, Ariz, and the Eiteljorg Museum in Indianapolis, Indiana, with work collected by the Museum of Natural History in Paris and the Minneapolis Institute of Arts Museum, Minn.

Pennies From Hell
Through September 2 2021

Selections from the MAM Collection

Included are featured pieces from the MAM Collection which focus on the effects of extraction, including George Gogas’ enigmatic painting M-M Cocktail: Ingredients: 1 Part Missoula Air, 1 Part Milltown Water which refers to the inversion pollution in the Missoula Valley, coupled with the problematic legacy of Milltown, a blue-collar community which lies seven miles to the east of Missoula. The Milltown Dam at the confluence of the Clark Fork and Blackfoot rivers historically aided timber extraction and the nearby sawmill. The dam, downstream from the open-pit mines of Butte and the smelter in Anaconda, retained mine waste laden with heavy metals from the Clark Fork River and was declared a Superfund site, resulting in years of remediation.

Also included in the exhibition are photographer Mark Abrahamson’s vibrant semi-abstract aerial views in the Montana Legacy Suite, such as tailings, settling ponds, and Superfund sites, Gennie DeWeese’s iconic rendering of Montana clear cuts using cattle markers, Edgar Smith’s stunning landscape painting contrasting the Berkeley Pit to the grandeur of the Grand Canyon, Susan Barnes’ hand-painted photographs of impacted sites and communities, and drawings of the Hanford nuclear site in eastern Washington, whose fallout has moved on downwind through air currents and aquifers to Montana by Karen Rice.

The title of this show is borrowed from an article by the late Edwin "Ed" Dobb, who wrote extensively about the effects of the Berkeley Pit on his hometown of Butte. Click here to read Pennies from Hell: In Montana, the Bill for Copper Comes Due from 1996. Dobb, along with CODEX Foundation director Peter R. Koch, conceived of the Extraction project but Dobb passed away before he could see it be completed.

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