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Milwaukee Art Museum Milwaukee Art Museum
Milwaukee, WI
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Milwaukee Art Museum
700 N. Art Museum Drive, Milwaukee, WI 53202
Phone: 414-224-3200
Fax: 414-271-7588
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Email: mam@mam.org


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Exhibitions


Events

19th-Century European Academic Paintings
TBD

Throughout Europe, the official manner for artists to learn their craft, and ultimately to exhibit those abilities, was through the Royal Academy. Most major cities had such an academy—those in Paris and London had the greatest influence. Far more than places of learning and exhibition, these institutions were tastemakers; their recommendations, whether through what was exhibited, which artists were hired as faculty, or what was being taught, defined what was regarded as aesthetically and artistically successful, and also determined who received commissions. Great attention was placed on the models provided by classical art, and history painting was regarded as the highest and most noble genre.

This gallery contains examples of academic art from across Europe—including painters from France, Germany, and England. It also houses one of the Museum’s most beloved paintings, Jules Bastien-Lepage’s The Wood Gatherer.

Take a tour through the gallery and learn more about the works on view, with Tanya Paul, Isabel and Alfred Bader Curator of European Art. Press the play button above to begin.

Byrdcliffe: Creativity and Creation
TBD
The Godfrey American Art Wing, Level 2, Gallery K230

Layton Art Collection Focus Exhibition

“Though Byrdcliffe brimmed with spiritual moxie—and fun, too, as attested by photographs of picnics, parties and such—its most important material product was the beautifully decorated Arts and Crafts furniture turned out by the colony’s woodworking shop.” —The New York Times

For a utopian community in upstate New York, handcrafting, natural materials, and organic design were guiding principles. The Arts and Crafts movement was growing in popularity—it was the early twentieth century—and the Byrdcliffe Arts and Crafts Colony (active 1902–1915) put the movement’s anti-industrialization position into active practice. The drawings, designs, ceramics, and furniture that came out of Byrdcliffe, one of several such communities to emerge in that part of the country at the time, had a distinct style and aesthetic continuity. Developed alongside Elbert Hubbard’s Roycroft and Gustav Stickley’s Craftsman Workshops, Byrdcliffe was built on the idealistic vision of its founders, Ralph Radcliffe Whitehead and Jane Byrd McCall Whitehead.

Byrdcliffe: Creativity and Creation traces the creative process behind many of Byrdcliffe’s designs through works drawn from the Layton Art Collection and local private collections.

Supporting Sponsors:
Barbara Nitchie Fuldner Layton Art Collection, Inc.

Thanks to the Museum Visionaries:
Debbie and Mark Attanasio Donna and Donald Baumgartner John and Murph Burke Sheldon and Marianne Lubar Joel and Caran Quadracci Sue and Bud Selig Jeff Yabuki and the Yabuki Family Foundation

Byrdcliffe: Creativity and Creation is a Layton Art Collection Focus Exhibition. The steward of the collection that Frederick Layton started, one of Milwaukee’s founding public art collections, the Layton Art Collection Inc. is proud to partner with the Milwaukee Art Museum.

The Bauhaus, László Moholy-Nagy, and Milwaukee
TBD
LEVEL 2, GALLERY K215

On the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the Bauhaus (1919–1933), the innovative art, architecture, and design school in Germany, the display in this gallery highlights one of its key figures: artist, designer, and theorist László Moholy-Nagy. Among the objects featured is a new addition to the Museum’s collection, a one-of-a-kind desk set he created for the Wisconsin company Parker Pen in 1946.

The Milwaukee Art Institute (1916–1957), a Milwaukee Art Museum predecessor, not only hosted the first traveling exhibition of Moholy-Nagy’s photographs in the United States in 1931, but also presented the first U.S. exhibition about the Bauhaus, organized by the Museum of Modern Art, in 1939.

Thanks to the Museum Visionaries:
Debbie and Mark Attanasio Donna and Donald Baumgartner John and Murph Burke Sheldon and Marianne Lubar Joel and Caran Quadracci Sue and Bud Selig Jeff Yabuki and the Yabuki Family Foundation

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