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Georgia Museum of Art Georgia Museum of Art
Athens, GA
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Georgia Museum of Art
90 Carlton Street
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602-6719

General: 706.542.GMOA (4662)
Fax: 706.542.1051
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www.georgiamuseum.org

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Kevin Cole: Soul Ties
Saturday, Jan 25, 2020 — Sunday, Apr 19, 2020
Dorothy Alexander Roush Gallery

“Kevin Cole: Soul Ties” features selected works by Atlanta-based painter and mixed-media artist Kevin Cole. Cole was born in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, and remains active in Atlanta, Georgia, and nationally. Cole was named Georgia State Artist of the Year in 1996 and has completed over 35 public art commissions, including the Coca-Cola Centennial Olympic Mural for the 1996 Olympic games and “Soul Ties That Matter,” a 55-foot-long installation created for Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport in 2018. The artist’s work is included in more than 3,600 public, private and corporate collections throughout the United States, including the new National Museum of African American History and Culture at the Smithsonian Museum in Washington, D.C.

Cole’s paintings, three-dimensional wooden and metal constructions, are recognizable due to his frequent use of the necktie as a motif, which alludes to both struggle and celebration in the African American experience. Colorful works such as “Spiritual Celebration with Miles, Dizzy and Coltrane” (1992) make reference to the rich history and improvisational nature of jazz and blues music. In addition to the exhibition, “When My Scars are My Testimony” (2018) is on display in the museum’s M. Smith Griffith Grand Hall as an elegant amalgamation of twisted ties formed with thin strips of etched aluminum.

Curator
Shawnya L. Harris, Larry D. and Brenda A. Thompson Curator of African American and African Diasporic Art

Reflecting on Rembrandt: 500 Years of Etching
Jan 18, 2020 — Apr 19, 2020

For the 350th anniversary of the death of Rembrandt van Rijn, this exhibition of prints selected from the museum’s collection and created by students in the Lamar Dodd School of Art commemorates the artist’s profound impact, especially as a printmaker. For the majority of students in ARST 3315 Printmaking: Etching, the works in this exhibition represent some of their first efforts with this demanding medium and a response to the tradition of viewing Rembrandt as a guide and standard of achievement. Orchestrating this demonstration of influence, students in ARHI4310/6310 Northern Baroque Art combined these contemporary works with prints by Rembrandt, his peers and his followers. Their choices reveal both the extent of Rembrandt’s own interests in technique and composition as well as the impact these had on artists and viewers to follow. For them and for us, Rembrandt’s art can be a mirror for self-reflection or a fragment of a kaleidoscopic world view.

Curator
UGA Lamar Dodd School of Art students in ARST 3315 and ARHI 4310/6310, with the assistance of Mark Callahan and Shelley ZurawSaturday, Jan 25, 2020 — Sunday, Apr 19, 2020

Master, Pupil, Follower: 16th- to 18th-Century Italian Works on Paper
Dec 21, 2019 — Mar 08, 2020
Boone and George-Ann Knox Gallery II

This exhibition showcases approximately 30 drawings and prints dating from the 16th to the 18th centuries and drawn from the collections of Giuliano Ceseri of Lafayette, Louisiana, the Georgia Museum of Art and the Jeffrey Horvitz Collection. Curators selected drawings and prints to represent specific artistic styles and Italian regional schools. An examination of the drawings has revealed some previously erroneous assumptions. In a few cases, new attributions have resulted; in others, authorship remains unresolved. The museum will publish a fully illustrated exhibition catalogue containing this scholarship and publishing important drawings by Giulio Romano, Claudio Ridolfi, Palma il Giovane and Guercino for the first time. Other artists include Giulio Benso, Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione, Salvatore Rosa and followers of Veronese and Tintoretto.

Curator
Robert Randolf Coleman, professor emeritus, Renaissance and Baroque art history, University of Notre Dame; Nelda Damiano, Pierre Daura Curator of European Art, Georgia Museum of Art; and Benedetta Spadaccini, Biblioteca Ambrosiana, Milano

Sponsors
The W. Newton Morris Charitable Foundation and the Friends of the Georgia Museum of ArtDorothy Alexander Roush Gallery

The Monsters Are Due on Broad Street: Patrick Dean
Saturday, Dec 21, 2019 — Sunday, Mar 29, 2020

Cartoonist Patrick Dean drew a weekly strip for Athens’ alternative newsweekly, Flagpole magazine, from 1997 to 2006, as well as many covers. Influenced by Jack Davis, George Grosz, Tomi Ungerer and early Mad Magazine, he populates his scenes with a wide variety of characters interacting with one another, capturing a broad range of Athens’ population. Jokes abound, and monsters are humanized as much as people are monsterfied. In 2018, Dean was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neurone disease (MND) or Lou Gehrig’s disease. He continues to draw, despite his increasing difficulties doing so. This small retrospective begins with his student work at UGA, from which he graduated in 1998, and ends with his recent comics about illness and mortality.“Kevin Cole: Soul Ties” features selected works by Atlanta-based painter and mixed-media artist Kevin Cole. Cole was born in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, and remains active in Atlanta, Georgia, and nationally. Cole was named Georgia State Artist of the Year in 1996 and has completed over 35 public art commissions, including the Coca-Cola Centennial Olympic Mural for the 1996 Olympic games and “Soul Ties That Matter,” a 55-foot-long installation created for Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport in 2018. The artist’s work is included in more than 3,600 public, private and corporate collections throughout the United States, including the new National Museum of African American History and Culture at the Smithsonian Museum in Washington, D.C.

Material Georgia 1733–1900: Two Decades of Scholarship
Saturday, Nov 16, 2019 — Sunday, Mar 15, 2020

This exhibition will review 20 years of scholarly activity at the Henry D. Green Center for the Study of the Decorative Arts. It will include numerous examples of furniture, textiles, pottery and metal work, present a synthesis of Green Center work, show new research and point the way for future research in Georgia-related decorative arts. It will be accompanied by an extensively illustrated book published by the museum.Cole’s paintings, three-dimensional wooden and metal constructions, are recognizable due to his frequent use of the necktie as a motif, which alludes to both struggle and celebration in the African American experience. Colorful works such as “Spiritual Celebration with Miles, Dizzy and Coltrane” (1992) make reference to the rich history and improvisational nature of jazz and blues music. In addition to the exhibition, “When My Scars are My Testimony” (2018) is on display in the museum’s M. Smith Griffith Grand Hall as an elegant amalgamation of twisted ties formed with thin strips of etched aluminum.

Rachel Whiteread
Through March 08, 2020
Jane and Harry Willson Sculpture Garden

Five cast-stone sculptures by Rachel Whiteread reinterpret the artist’s earlier resin castings of the space beneath chairs. The works are arranged in a table setting, reinforcing their domestic nature and origins. Variations in the stone type and surface textures of each piece make use of changes in outdoor lighting over the course of a day. All loans are courtesy of Gagosian. The museum has also selected works on paper by Whiteread and related artists from its collections that will be on display inside, in the galleries on the second floor. These works provide additional context to the use of negative space in Whiteread’s work.

Whiteread was born in London in 1963. She studied painting at Brighton Polytechnic from 1982 to 1985 and sculpture at the Slade School of Fine Art from 1985 to 1987. In 1993, she was the first woman to win the Turner Prize. She represented the British Pavilion at the 47th Venice Biennale in 1997, and in 2000 she completed a commission for the Holocaust Memorial at the Judenplatz in Vienna, Austria. From 2017 to 2018 a retrospective exhibition of her work was on view at the Tate Britain in London and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

Curator: Annelies Mondi, deputy directorCurator

Drama and Devotion in Baroque Rome
Through August 23, 2020
Nelda Damiano

Rome has long been a key destination for artists. At the beginning of the 17th century, painters from across Europe flocked to the Eternal City to see the revolution caused by painter Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571 – 1610). Everyone copied his stark contrast of light and dark, powerful realism and dramatic sense of staging. The works presented in this exhibition, all from the Museum and Gallery at Bob Jones University, celebrate how Caravaggio shaped the Italian Baroque and galvanized numerous followers. One of the main highlights is a Crucifixion by Peter Paul Rubens, who spent more than eight years in Italy.

Curator
Nelda Damiano, Pierre Daura Curator of European ArtShawnya L. Harris, Larry D. and Brenda A. Thompson Curator of African American and African Diasporic Art

Belleek Porcelain from the Collection of Linda N. Beard
Wall case gifted by Linda N. and Larry H. Beard, permanent collection galleries

This periodically rotating exhibition of Belleek porcelain comprises masterworks from the comprehensive and noted collection of Linda N. Beard. The roots of Belleek porcelain production lay in the lands of John Caldwell Bloomfield, who in 1849 had a geologic survey of his property in the village of Belleek, County Fermanagh, in what would later become Northern Ireland, that revealed rich deposits of minerals. In large part, Belleek production came into being as a response to economic distress, as opposed to affluence and the rise of empire that had served as the basis for earlier factories. Characterized by a distinctive and sensuous “pearl” glaze, Belleek porcelain has uniform quality often not found in the production of other great European porcelain factories. Ireland, then an impoverished country with no strong tradition of porcelain manufacture, seems an unlikely venue for the rise of a world-class center making such a refined and technically challenging product. Yet, the Belleek firm, Belleek Pottery Works Company Ltd., was a success in all its aims, both economic and artistic.

Curator
Dale Couch, curator of decorative arts

Sponsors
The W. Newton Morris Charitable Foundation and the Friends of the Georgia Museum of Art. This exhibition is also supported by the Georgia Humanities Council and the National Endowment for the Humanities and through appropriations from the Georgia General

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