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Frist Center for the Visual Arts FRIST ART MUSEUM
Nashville, TN

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Kara Walker: Cut to the Quick, from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation.
Jul 23–Oct 10, 2021
Upper-Level Galleries

This exhibition contains mature content, including depictions of physical and sexual violence.

A leading artist of her generation, Kara Walker (b. 1969) works in a range of mediums, including prints, drawings, paintings, sculpture, film, and the large-scale silhouette cutouts for which she is perhaps most recognized. Her powerful and provocative images employ contradictions to critique the painful legacies of slavery, sexism, violence, imperialism, and other power structures, including those in the history and hierarchies of art and contemporary culture. This exhibition offers a broad overview of her career through more than 80 works from the collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation, premier collectors of works on paper in the United States. Some highlights of the exhibition are the complete Emancipation Approximation series and images from the Porgy & Bess series. Walker’s process involves extensive research in history, literature, art history, and popular culture. Intentionally unsentimental and ambiguous, the works can be disturbing while also utilizing satire and humor, always exploring the irreconcilable inconsistencies that mirror the human condition. This is Walker’s first solo exhibition at the Frist Art Museum; her work Camptown Ladies appeared in our presentation of 30 Americans in 2013–14.

Frist Art Museum executive director and CEO Dr. Susan H. Edwards and Nashville poet Ciona Rouse served as co-curators. In addition to her curatorial responsibilities, Rouse composed original poems inspired by Walker’s works. She and Edwards have collaborated with educator Meagan Rust to plan programs related to the exhibition

Exhibition tour schedule:
July 23–October 10, 2021—Frist Art Museum, Nashville, TN
November 5–January 17, 2022—Cincinnati Art Museum, OH
May 20–September 25, 2022—Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville, FL
March 9–June 24, 2023—Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art, Virginia Beach, VA
Fall 2023—USC Fisher Museum of Art, Los Angeles, CA

Teens Take the Frist!
Jun 18–Sep 5, 2021

Prompted by our vision of inspiring people through art to look at their world in new ways, the Frist Art Museum invited teens to submit their artwork for this third edition of Teens Take the Frist! The resulting selection features more than 180 artworks in a variety of mediums—including over fifty in this online exhibition—created by emerging artists from Cheatham, Davidson, Robertson, Rutherford, Sumner, Williamson, and Wilson Counties.

This exhibition, along with other Frist initiatives like Teen ARTlabs and the Teen Arts Action Group, is intended to give individuals ages 13–19 a safe space to express themselves and participate in activities with art professionals. With many students having to adjust to the challenges of COVID-19 restrictions, art has become more important than ever as an avenue of communication and connection.

We extend special thanks to our artists and adult mentors for their guidance and enthusiasm in creating nurturing spaces for our youth to grow.

All works © the artist and appear courtesy of the artist.

Our teen programs receive funding from the William N. Rollins Fund for the Arts of The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee.

Designing the New: Charles Rennie Mackintosh and the Glasgow Style
Jun 11–Sep 12, 2021
Ingram Gallery

At the end of the nineteenth century, the Glasgow Style emerged as the major manifestation of Art Nouveau in Britain. This exhibition showcases Charles Rennie Mackintosh—the greatest exponent of the Glasgow Style—as an architect, designer, and artist, and contextualizes his production within a larger circle of designers and craftspeople in the major Scottish city. Mackintosh worked most closely with his wife, Margaret Macdonald; Margaret’s sister, Frances Macdonald; and Frances’ husband, James Herbert McNair. They met as students at the progressive Glasgow School of Art in 1892 and together were known as The Four.

Combining influences from the Arts and Crafts movement, Celtic Revival, and Japonism, Glasgow artists created their own modern design aesthetic, synonymous with sleek lines and emphatic geometries expressed in a wide range of materials. The exhibition presents 165 works of fine and decorative art, including architectural drawings, books, ceramics, furniture, posters, textiles, and watercolors, drawn from Glasgow’s most significant public and private collections.

Designing the New: Charles Rennie Mackintosh and the Glasgow Style is a touring exhibition co-organized by Glasgow Museums and the American Federation of Arts. The exhibition comprises works from the collections of Glasgow City Council (Museums and Collections), with loans from Scottish collections and private lenders. Support for the US national tour is provided by the Dr. Lee MacCormick Edwards Charitable Foundation.

Bethany Collins in her studio. Photo by Chris Edward
Jun 11–Sep 12, 2021
Gordon CAP Gallery

Chicago-based artist Bethany Collins (b. 1984) explores the intersection of language and race in her conceptually driven practice. She alters existing documents—such as the daily Birmingham News from 1963 or the U.S. Department of Justice’s report on the Ferguson, Missouri, police department—to critique the truthfulness and completeness of the official record. Since 2016, Collins has also examined translations of Homer’s epic poem The Odyssey, an ancient text of exile and homecoming, and familiarity and estrangement from one’s homeland.

At the Frist, a new artist book will feature one hundred versions of “The Star Spangled Banner,” written from the 18th to the 21st centuries in support of specific political or social causes—from temperance and suffrage to abolition and even the confederacy. The multiple reinterpretations of this song—composed in 1814 by Francis Scott Key and the U.S. national anthem since 1931—will offer opportunities for reflection on patriotism, belonging, and individual position within national identity, a particularly resonant topic following a presidential election year.

Funded in part by the Gordon CAP Gallery Fund

With additional support from

Clay Blevins
John and Melinda Buntin
Susan H. Edwards
Jennifer and Billy Frist
Frank and Gwen Gordon Julie and Bob Gordon
Gail Gordon Jacobs
Louise and Neil Kohler
Neil Krugman and Lee Pratt
Kent Rollins and Belinda Butler

Anna Snader. Voces Fuertes, 2020
JunE 18–Sep 5, 2021

Prompted by our vision of inspiring people through art to look at their world in new ways, the Frist Art Museum invited teens to submit their artwork for this third edition of Teens Take the Frist! The resulting selection features more than 180 artworks in a variety of mediums—including over fifty in this online exhibition—created by emerging artists from Cheatham, Davidson, Robertson, Rutherford, Sumner, Williamson, and Wilson Counties.

This exhibition, along with other Frist initiatives like Teen ARTlabs and the Teen Arts Action Group, is intended to give individuals ages 13–19 a safe space to express themselves and participate in activities with art professionals. With many students having to adjust to the challenges of COVID-19 restrictions, art has become more important than ever as an avenue of communication and connection.

We extend special thanks to our artists and adult mentors for their guidance and enthusiasm in creating nurturing spaces for our youth to grow.

All works appear courtesy of the artists.

Our teen programs receive funding from the William N. Rollins Fund for the Arts of The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee.

A Landmark Repurposed celebrates the historic building that the Frist Art Museum is privileged to occupy—Nashville’s former main post office.
Jan 8, 2021–Feb. 27, 2022
Conte Community Arts Gallery

Commemorating the Frist’s 20th anniversary, this reimagined exhibition with updated design and expanded narrative highlights the building’s role as a civic institution, from its creation as the city’s main post office in 1934 to its reopening as an art museum on April 8, 2001. Through archival images, architectural drawings, “Then and Now” photographs, news clippings, and original planning documents, guests will learn about the building’s distinctive architectural styles, as well as how historical events affected the construction and function of the post office. The exhibition will also address how buildings can be repurposed, making connections with American Art Deco: Designing for the People, which will be on view in the Ingram Gallery from October 8, 2021, through January 2, 2022.

Constructed in 1933–34 under the direction of local firm Marr & Holman, the building was financed by the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Construction. Following guidelines from the Office of the Supervising Architect, the building displays the two most distinctive architectural styles of the period: “starved” or “stripped” classicism and art deco.

During the Depression, architects working for the federal government were expected to express in their buildings the values of permanence, stability, and order—values that a classical style had traditionally embodied—but in forms streamlined to suggest progress and simplified to lower production costs. Inside, cast aluminum doors and grillwork, as well as colored marble and stones on the floors and walls, follow the more decorative trend commonly known as art deco, which had developed in commercial interiors during the 1920s.

The building has long been central to the life of the city. During its construction, unemployed workers gathered by the hundreds at the building site, seeking jobs. World War II soldiers sent last letters to loved ones before boarding trains next door at Union Station on their way to the European front. Every April, long lines of last-minute tax filers formed, with postal workers sometimes accepting the returns in the street.

In 1984, the post office building was officially added to the National Register of Historic Places. Two years later, however, a new main postal distribution center was constructed on Royal Parkway, near Nashville International Airport, and much of the old building was no longer needed. After years of deliberation and with community demand, a solution for the building’s future was determined. Through a unique public-private partnership between Metro Nashville government and Dr. Thomas Frist, Jr., the building would be transformed into a visual arts center.

Tuck-Hinton Architects of Nashville guided the preservation of the post office building’s architectural details and spirit. The original pine floors were taken up, refinished, and reinstalled, and the huge high-ceilinged sorting rooms in the center of the original facility were naturally suited to their new role as spacious exhibition galleries. The former skylight in the center of the building, previously covered in the 1950s, had its function resurrected in the new design, accompanied by clerestory windows that now light the atrium and the grand staircases.

The building began its second life as the Frist Center for the Visual Arts on April 8, 2001, with the mission to present and originate high quality exhibitions with related educational programs and community outreach activities. Since opening, the Frist has hosted artists and artworks from collections around the world and invited Nashville’s community members and visitors to share in its vision of inspiring people through art to look at the world in new ways. On April 2, 2018, the name was formally changed to the Frist Art Museum to convey more clearly what visitors can expect when entering the building.

Organized by the Frist Art Museum

Exhibition Catalogue
A twentieth-anniversary edition of the exhibition catalogue, now titled A Landmark Repurposed: From Post Office to Art Museum, will be published this spring. To be notified when it becomes available, please contact giftshop@FristArtMuseum.org.

The volume will feature a preface by Billy Frist, chair and president of the Frist Art Museum board of trustees, and an epilogue by Susan H. Edwards, Frist Art Museum executive director and CEO.

The contents from the original book include historian Christine Kreyling’s essay about our landmark building and its position within Nashville’s architectural history. This revised edition was designed and produced by renowned art book publisher Lucia | Marquand.

The Frist Art Museum gratefully acknowledges the generosity of our O’Keeffe Circle members in funding this exhibition:
Judy and Joe Barker
Patricia Frist Elcan and Charles A. Elcan
Jennifer and Billy Frist
Julie and Tommy Frist
Patricia C. Frist and Thomas F. Frist, Jr., MD
R. Milton and Denice Johnson
Neil Krugman and Lee Pratt
Sid and Linda Pilson
Delphine and Ken Roberts
Anne and Joe Russell
Mr. and Mrs. James C. Seabury III
Olivia Tyson

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