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Columbus Museum of Art Columbus Museum of Art
Columbus, Ohio
Museum Photo by Brad Feinknopf


Columbus Museum of Art
480 E Broad St Columbus, OH
Columbus, OH 43215
614-221-6801
614-221-4848 (24-hr info)

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E-mail: info@cmaohio.org


www.columbusmuseum.org

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Exhibitions:


Events


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Present Generations: Creating the Scantland Collection of the Columbus Museum of Art
6.25.21–5.22.22

Artists: Felipe Baeza, Cristina BanBan, Greg Breda, Coady Brown, Lucy Bull, Jonathan Lyndon Chase, Somaya Critchlow, Julie Curtiss, Jadé Fadojutimi, Derek Fordjour, Louis Fratino, Jerrell Gibbs, Aaron Gilbert, Jenna Gribbon, Lauren Halsey, Alexander Harrison, Angela Heisch, Jammie Holmes, Deana Lawson, GaHee Park, Hilary Pecis, Devan Shimoyama, Emily Mae Smith, Vaughn Spann, Claire Tabouret, Ambera Wellmann, Robin F. Williams

Featuring work by some of the most exciting and thought-provoking artists practicing today, Present Generations comprises the first wave of promised gifts that will inaugurate the Columbus Museum of Art’s Scantland Collection. With vivid paintings as well as photographic and sculptural installations, the works by 27 artists in Present Generations show the creative exuberance of contemporary art practice as it also grapples with questions of visibility and identity among other urgent and underlying social concerns.

The Scantland Collection is one of the most dynamic young private collections of contemporary visual art in North America. From its position in Columbus, Ohio, the Collection is committed to a broad perspective on the creative energies of this moment; its intention is to form an evolving and wide-ranging picture of art in the mid-21st century. With a growing list of promised gifts to the Columbus Museum of Art, the Scantland Collection ensures that its ambitious program to collect the art of the present will remain part of its community for generations to come.

The Columbus Museum of Art’s renowned collection of modern painting is largely comprised of once-private collections of contemporary art. Gifted in 1931, the Ferdinand Howald Collection included significant works by Charles Demuth, Arthur Dove, Marsden Hartley, Diego Rivera, as well as Europeans Georges Braque, Henri Matisse, and Pablo Picasso. CMA went on to acquire the Sirak Collection of Impressionism and European Modernism, the Schiller Collection of American Social Commentary Art, 1930–1970, and a major collection of the New York Photo League. Extending the Schiller Collection’s commitment to the relationship between art and society, the Scantland Collection joins these with the aim of becoming the next significant pillar of the Museum’s permanent collection.

Many of the works in Present Generations have stylistic roots within the Museum’s modernist collection as well. Enigmatic paintings by Coady Brown, Julie Curtiss, Aaron Gilbert, and Gahee Park, for example, recall those by Magic Realist painters such as Paul Cadmus and George Tooker. Louis Fratino looks to artists like Demuth and Charles Sheeler in his work, while the painting by Jerrell Gibbs is directly inspired by works of Matisse in CMA’s collection.

In addition to lush abstractions and ecstatic figurative paintings, Present Generations also includes powerful photographic and sculptural works by Derek Fordjour, Lauren Halsey, and Deana Lawson. As throughout the exhibition, these works engage historical forms and narratives as a way of acting upon and being alive to the present moment. As part of the Scantland Collection of the Columbus Museum of Art, these works will continue to generate excitement, reflection, and creative response.
Columbus Comics Residency Exhibition: Tara Booth
9.5.20–8.29.21

Tara Booth is this year’s recipient of the Columbus Comics Residency. This is the ninth year of the program, which is a collaboration between CMA and CCAD.

Columbus Museum of Art’s exhibition of Tara’s work will be on view in the Open Gallery of CMA’s JPMorgan Chase Center for Creativity. Tara Booth’s painted comics have gained a widespread and loyal audience for their painterly design, honest humor, and emotional vulnerability. The exhibition includes original paintings by Tara, enlarged reproductions of her work, and clothing printed with patterns she designed. In an interview with itsnicethat.com Tara said, “A lot of my work is about living with chronic anxiety and depression. Taking the parts of my life that leave me feeling hopeless or out of control, and being able to turn them into something sort of silly through painting helps to transform some of my negative emotions. It’s also super validating and therapeutic to see how many people deal with the same issues and have similar experiences. The more that people can laugh and relate to my work, the more compelled I am to make it.”

Tara will participate in the Cartoon Crossroads Columbus (CXC) festival, which takes place online this year from October 1 through 4. Tara is a Special Guest at the festival, and she will be interviewed by Jared Gardner (Pop Culture Studies at OSU) in an online public program.

Partially Buried: Land-Based Art in Ohio, 1970 to Now
May 8–November 28, 2021

In 1970, artist Robert Smithson created Partially Buried Woodshed on the campus of Kent State University, covering an abandoned woodshed with soil until its central beam cracked. Unsettling traditional notions of landscape and environmental art, Smithson’s project also addressed a connection to Ohio’s indigenous earthworks, many of which were destroyed—or willfully overlooked—by white settlers during the Frontier Era.

In the decades since, artists have continued to approach Ohio’s landscape as a site and a subject, challenging the conventional representations of the state’s history and cultural legacy. Gathering works from a diverse group of artists, Partially Buried: Land-Based Art in Ohio, 1970 to Now grapples with the state’s history as a former frontier territory, confronting unanswered questions around land use, interpretation, preservation, and representation. The exhibition unearths a legacy of radical imagination through artists’ interventions in the Ohio landscape.

Partially Buried: Land-Based Art in Ohio, 1970 to Now is curated by Anna Talarico, MA candidate in Contemporary Art and Curatorial Practice at The Ohio State University. The exhibition represents a collaborative partnership between the Columbus Museum of Art and The Ohio State University’s Department of History of Art and is sponsored by a Community Engagement Grant from The College of Arts and Sciences at The Ohio State University as part of the Global Arts + Humanities Discovery Theme. Additional funding is provided by an Alumni Grant for Graduate Research and Scholarship from The Graduate School at The Ohio State University.
Think Outside the Brick: The Creative Art of LEGO®
Through 8.20.2021

CMA’s annual celebration of the creative potential of LEGO® bricks returns, featuring an enormous model of Columbus built collaboratively by the Ohio LEGO User’s Group (OhioLUG). The exhibition includes the return of familiar landmarks, imaginative creations, and COVID-19 safety updates.

Join in on the fun at home with these CMA LEGO Minifigure drawing templates! Share your creations on social media channels by using #MyCMA.

Friends of Think Outside the Brick
D. Alan and Peggy K. Scantland
Ron and Ann Pizzuti
Mary and Will Vorys
Loann W. Crane
Robin and Mark Howard
Wendy and Chris Johnson
The Leahy and Yen Family
Peg Mativi, Erica and Micky Fullen Family
Betsy and Bryan Ross Family
Jessica Byers
The Gasbarro Family
Austin and Jill Hawley
Sevy, Kyle, Leighton, Luciana, and Lennon Kraner
Rob, Susan, Marco, and Asa Littleton
TJ, Connie, Logan, Matthew, Eva, and Lane Dwyer
David, Allison, Greta, and Lucy Evans
The Griffin Family – Scott, Gretchen, Natalie, and Noah
Ted & Deborah Knapke and families of Ann & Nick Whisler, Julie & Brett Payne, and Megan & Mike Savage
Brian, Courtney, Alex and Josie Sanders
Jude Streeter-Weitzel
The Ulman Family
Adrienne, Dan, Cara, and Fiona Wagne

Queer / Modern
TBD

Once an offensive slur, the word “queer” has been reclaimed as a way of resisting categorizations based on gender and sexuality. Emphasizing the divergence from normative heterosexuality, no one and nothing is queer in quite the same way.

When it comes to art, the term “modern” is similarly elastic. It emphasizes a distinction from traditional forms of culture but has no easy definition or singular expression of its own.

The works in this gallery, among them some of the most significant in the Museum’s collection, are by artists who participated in gay and lesbian culture in the early decades of the 20th century. They often did so under perilous circumstances, and simultaneously forged new directions for modern art and culture.

Paul Cadmus Le Ruban Dénoué Hommage à Reynaldo Hahn 1963 Museum Purchase, Derby Fund

Raggin’ On: The Art of Aminah Robinson’s House and Journals
Through October 3, 2021

In 2015, Aminah Brenda Lynn Robinson bequeathed almost her entire estate to CMA. For several years, CMA documented that gift and the vast amount of art, journals, and other ephemera that remained in her house. Raggin’ On: The Art of Aminah Brenda Lynn Robinson’s House and Journals is the first major exhibition of the artist’s work since her death and a celebration of Robinson’s work, vision and the home, and neighborhood she cherished.

Raggin’ On presents seven decades of Aminah Robinson’s art and writing. The exhibition invites visitors to experience the artist’s home and creative processes and to better understand her intention “to celebrate the everyday lives and culture of Black people and their endurance through centuries of injustice.” In addition to Robinson’s art, this exhibition includes furnishings she made for her house; books from her impressive library; collections of buttons, fabrics, canes, dolls, and thimbles; art she traded with other artists; and photo enlargements of her living spaces and studios. Complementing the visceral experience reflective of the artist’s home, visitors will explore their own stories and peruse Robinson’s journals.

The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue with more than 200 illustrations and with essays by Curators Carole Genshaft and Deidre Hamlar and additional scholars including Lisa Gail Collins, Ramona Austin, Lisa Farrington, Debra Priestly, and William McDaniel

In 2015, Aminah Brenda Lynn Robinson bequeathed almost her entire estate to CMA. For several years, CMA documented that gift and the vast amount of art, journals, and other ephemera that remained in her house. Raggin’ On: The Art of Aminah Brenda Lynn Robinson’s House and Journals is the first major exhibition of the artist’s work since her death and a celebration of Robinson’s work, vision and the home, and neighborhood she cherished.

Raggin’ On presents seven decades of Aminah Robinson’s art and writing. The exhibition invites visitors to experience the artist’s home and creative processes and to better understand her intention “to celebrate the everyday lives and culture of Black people and their endurance through centuries of injustice.” In addition to Robinson’s art, this exhibition includes furnishings she made for her house; books from her impressive library; collections of buttons, fabrics, canes, dolls, and thimbles; art she traded with other artists; and photo enlargements of her living spaces and studios. Complementing the visceral experience reflective of the artist’s home, visitors will explore their own stories and peruse Robinson’s journals.

The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue with more than 200 illustrations and with essays by Curators Carole Genshaft and Deidre Hamlar and additional scholars including Lisa Gail Collins, Ramona Austin, Lisa Farrington, Debra Priestly, and William McDaniel

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