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The Memphis Brooks Museum of Art Cleveland Museum of Art
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Spotlight on a New Generation: Contemporary Chinese Artists
TBD
Clara T. Rankin Galleries of Chinese Art: Galleries 240A and 241C

In the last 100 years, China has undergone dramatic changes, including the emperor’s abdication in 1912, the establishment of the Republic of China (1912–49), the Communist takeover under Mao Zedong in 1949, the Cultural Revolution (1966–76), and the establishment of reforms after Mao’s death in 1976.

Today China is among the world’s fastest growing economies, becoming a global leader in renewable energy, artificial intelligence, and green technology. Its relevance in the art world also grows as Chinese contemporary artists have gained international recognition.

The works presented here were produced by artists living in mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and the US who all reference traditional media and artistic practices—like working with ink on paper or silk—but breach historic boundaries by using new formats, techniques, and subject matter.

The Cleveland Museum of Art is funded in part by residents of Cuyahoga County through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture.

This exhibition was supported in part by the Ohio Arts Council, which receives support from the State of Ohio and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Picasso and Paper
Through 08/23/2020

Pablo Picasso’s prolonged engagement with paper is the subject of the groundbreaking exhibition Picasso and Paper, organized by the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Royal Academy of Arts, London, in collaboration with the Musée national Picasso-Paris.

Featuring nearly 300 works spanning the artist’s entire career, Picasso and Paper offers new insights into Picasso’s creative spirit and working methods. Nowhere is Picasso’s protean spirit more evident than in his relentless exploration of working on and with paper. He drew incessantly, using many different media—including watercolor, pastel, and gouache—on a broad range of papers. He assembled collages of cut-and-pasted papers; created sculptures from pieces of torn and burnt paper; produced both documentary photographs and manipulated photographs on paper; and spent decades investigating an array of printmaking techniques on paper supports.

Among the exhibition highlights are Women at Their Toilette (1937–38, Musée national Picasso-Paris), an extraordinary collage (14 1/2 feet wide) of cut-and-pasted papers; outstanding Cubist papiers collés; sketchbooks from the artist’s early to late years, including studies for Les Demoiselles d’Avignon; and constructed paper guitars from the Cubist and Surrealist periods. Visitors will also discover collaborative photograms made with Dora Maar and André Villers, illustrated books, and drawings on a vast range of materials, including newspaper, envelopes, antique laid papers, and personal ephemera.

Presented in a series of chronologically unfolding themes, the works are displayed together with closely related paintings and sculptures to provide a deeper context for understanding their meaning and historical position in Picasso’s art. For example, Picasso’s preparatory studies for his Blue Period masterpiece, La Vie (Life) of 1903 (Cleveland Museum of Art), are presented together with the painting and other works exploring corresponding themes of poverty, despair, and social alienation. In the Cubist section, Picasso’s drawings for Head of a Woman (Fernande) of 1909 (Musée national Picasso-Paris) are joined by the associated bronze sculpture. Newly restored drawings made with colored, felt-tip pens on newsprint for the film Le Mystère Picasso are shown together with the film.

The exhibition is curated by William H. Robinson of the Cleveland Museum of Art; Ann Dumas of the Royal Academy of Arts, London; and Emilia Philippot of the Musée national Picasso-Paris.

Picasso and Paper is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue published by the Royal Academy of Arts. It features essays by distinguished Picasso scholars and leading authorities in various aspects of technical art history, including William H. Robinson of the Cleveland Museum of Art; Ann Dumas of the Royal Academy of Arts; Emilia Philippot of the Musée national Picasso-Paris; and Claustre Rafart Planas of the Museu Picasso, Barcelona. Specific aspects of Picasso’s engagement with paper are addressed by Christopher Lloyd, an expert on Picasso’s drawings; Stephen Coppel, curator of prints and drawings at the British Museum; Violette Andres, photography curator at the Musée national Picasso-Paris; Johan Popelard of the University of Paris; and Emmanuelle Hincelin, a paper conservator with scientific expertise in the types of paper Picasso used at key moments in his career
Through 08/23/2020

Pablo Picasso’s prolonged engagement with paper is the subject of the groundbreaking exhibition Picasso and Paper, organized by the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Royal Academy of Arts, London, in collaboration with the Musée national Picasso-Paris.

Featuring nearly 300 works spanning the artist’s entire career, Picasso and Paper offers new insights into Picasso’s creative spirit and working methods. Nowhere is Picasso’s protean spirit more evident than in his relentless exploration of working on and with paper. He drew incessantly, using many different media—including watercolor, pastel, and gouache—on a broad range of papers. He assembled collages of cut-and-pasted papers; created sculptures from pieces of torn and burnt paper; produced both documentary photographs and manipulated photographs on paper; and spent decades investigating an array of printmaking techniques on paper supports.

Among the exhibition highlights are Women at Their Toilette (1937–38, Musée national Picasso-Paris), an extraordinary collage (14 1/2 feet wide) of cut-and-pasted papers; outstanding Cubist papiers collés; sketchbooks from the artist’s early to late years, including studies for Les Demoiselles d’Avignon; and constructed paper guitars from the Cubist and Surrealist periods. Visitors will also discover collaborative photograms made with Dora Maar and André Villers, illustrated books, and drawings on a vast range of materials, including newspaper, envelopes, antique laid papers, and personal ephemera.

Presented in a series of chronologically unfolding themes, the works are displayed together with closely related paintings and sculptures to provide a deeper context for understanding their meaning and historical position in Picasso’s art. For example, Picasso’s preparatory studies for his Blue Period masterpiece, La Vie (Life) of 1903 (Cleveland Museum of Art), are presented together with the painting and other works exploring corresponding themes of poverty, despair, and social alienation. In the Cubist section, Picasso’s drawings for Head of a Woman (Fernande) of 1909 (Musée national Picasso-Paris) are joined by the associated bronze sculpture. Newly restored drawings made with colored, felt-tip pens on newsprint for the film Le Mystère Picasso are shown together with the film.

The exhibition is curated by William H. Robinson of the Cleveland Museum of Art; Ann Dumas of the Royal Academy of Arts, London; and Emilia Philippot of the Musée national Picasso-Paris.

Picasso and Paper is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue published by the Royal Academy of Arts. It features essays by distinguished Picasso scholars and leading authorities in various aspects of technical art history, including William H. Robinson of the Cleveland Museum of Art; Ann Dumas of the Royal Academy of Arts; Emilia Philippot of the Musée national Picasso-Paris; and Claustre Rafart Planas of the Museu Picasso, Barcelona. Specific aspects of Picasso’s engagement with paper are addressed by Christopher Lloyd, an expert on Picasso’s drawings; Stephen Coppel, curator of prints and drawings at the British Museum; Violette Andres, photography curator at the Musée national Picasso-Paris; Johan Popelard of the University of Paris; and Emmanuelle Hincelin, a paper conservator with scientific expertise in the types of paper Picasso used at key moments in his career

Ana Mendieta: Ochún
03/14/2020 - 08/02/2020\
Video Project Room | Gallery 224B

This video accompanies the exhibition A Graphic Revolution: Prints and Drawings in Latin America, on view in the James and Hanna Bartlett Prints and Drawings Gallery.

Cuban-born artist Ana Mendieta explored issues of the body, earth, and place throughout her brief but influential career. Ochún documents a sculpture from the Silueta series—for which Mendieta is best known—that involved constructing abstract female forms using organic materials such as blood, soil, fire, and feathers. These works were the focus of most of the nearly 80 films that Mendieta created beginning in 1973 when she was a student, establishing her as one of the most prolific artists to take up the medium at this time. Completed just a few years before the end of her life, Ochún is the only project the artist shot on the newer medium of videotape.

Ochún meditates on Mendieta’s experiences as an immigrant. In 1961, at age 12, she was separated from her family in Havana and sent to an orphanage in Iowa as part of a program for exiled children. The video features a Silueta sculpted from earth off the coast of Key Biscayne, on Florida’s southern tip. Water, which dominates the video’s views and soundtrack, is presented as a uniting element that connects both places, evoking the artist’s hope to capture “the transition between my homeland and my new home . . . reclaiming my roots and becoming one with nature.”

A Graphic Revolution: Prints and Drawings in Latin America
03/14/2020 - 08/02/2020
James and Hanna Bartlett Prints and Drawings Gallery | Gallery 101

This exhibition is the first to highlight the museum’s collection of works on paper produced in Latin America over the past century. Representing a wide range of countries, including Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, and Mexico, the works survey how artists have explored national and cultural identity during periods of political upheaval and dramatic social change. In particular, prints and drawings provided artists such as Roberto Matta, José Clemente Orozco, Jesús Rafael Soto, and Rufino Tamayo with a means of self-expression well suited for formal experimentation and reaching the broadest possible audience.

A Graphic Revolution begins with the realist style of Mexican muralists such as David Alfaro Siqueiros and Diego Rivera. Artists in their generation and in the ones that followed used the themes of people, politics, and abstraction to express the complexity of Latin American identity. Featuring approximately 50 works from the museum’s collection, the exhibition also highlights several important recent acquisitions by modern and contemporary Latin American artists, including León Ferrari, Gego, Wifredo Lam, and Liliana Porter.

Gold Needles: Embroidery Arts from Korea
Sun, 03/08/2020 to Sun, 07/26/2020
Arlene M. and Arthur S. Holden Textile Gallery | Gallery 234

Co-organized with the Seoul Museum of Craft Art, Gold Needles: Embroidery Arts from Korea celebrates anonymous women artists and their inventive creations that triumphed over the conventions of the patriarchal Joseon society. Through stunning examples of embroidery and patchwork, this exhibition explores Korean embroidered works of art as tools of empowerment to overcome social and cultural constraints.

Most of the loaned pieces—ceremonial robes, folding screens, gift-wrapping cloth, and wedding fans—borrowed from the Seoul Museum of Craft Art once belonged to Mr. Dong-hwa Huh (1926−2018) and Ms. Young-suk Park (b. 1932). The couple shared a passion for preserving Korean textiles and presenting their artistic distinctions to the world and donated their entire collection to the Seoul Museum of Craft Art in May 2018. The exhibition honors the couple’s lifelong collecting legacy and philanthropic bequest. An English-Korean bilingual gallery guide, including essays and illustrations, accompanies the exhibition.

Presenting Sponsors
Cathy Lincoln
John D. Proctor Foundation
Seoul Metropolitan Government

Supporting Sponsors
Joon-Li Kim and Robert Gudbranson
The Textile Art Alliance

Ilse Bing: Queen of the Leica
03/07/2020 - 06/28/2020
Mark Schwartz and Bettina Katz Photography Gallery | Gallery 230

In 1929 Ilse Bing (1899–1998) acquired a Leica, a new small, lightweight camera that took 36 shots per roll of film. Its technical characteristics, revolutionary at the time, encouraged spontaneity, experimentation, and boldness. The first professional to wholeheartedly adopt this 35mm single-lens camera, Bing was soon dubbed by a critic as the “Queen of the Leica” for the inventiveness and originality she brought to this innovative technology.

Bing, who was born and raised in Germany, developed a successful career in Paris in the 1930s as an avant-garde and fashion photographer. Daringly surreal even in her commercial work, she brought a fresh approach to fashion in assignments for Harper’s Bazaar and designers like Elsa Schiaparelli. For other magazines, Bing captured the nightlife, amusements, and unique character of her adopted city, producing images that crossed the boundary between commerce and art. Her photographs were included in exhibitions at the Louvre and New York’s Museum of Modern Art.

Upon the Nazi invasion of France in 1940, Bing and her husband, both German Jews, were interned, but in June 1941 they were able to immigrate to New York. She struggled to establish an equally successful career in a new culture amid the constraints of the war years. In the late 1950s Bing abandoned photography, turning her creativity instead to poetry, drawing, and collage.

In the mid-1970s, a renewed fascination with 1930s modernism and a newfound interest in women artists sparked Bing’s rediscovery. Enthusiasm for her work has remained high over the ensuing decades. This exhibition, drawn largely from the museum’s collection, comprises around 50 photographs spanning her career, most recent gifts and purchases on view here for the first time.

The Cleveland Museum of Art is funded in part by residents of Cuyahoga County through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture.

This exhibition was supported in part by the Ohio Arts Council, which receives support from the State of Ohio and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Tiffany in Bloom: Stained Glass Lamps of Louis Comfort Tiffany
10/20/2019 - 06/14/2020
Julia and Larry Pollock Focus Gallery | Gallery 010

Focusing on Louis Comfort Tiffany’s passion for stained glass as a way to bring nature’s splendid color into the home, this exhibition explores Tiffany’s vivid designs in relation to emerging artistic and craft movements at the turn of the 20th century. Through the dynamic, illuminated display of 20 of the designer’s finest stained glass table and floor lamps and featuring the iconic Hinds House stained glass window, Tiffany in Bloom introduces visitors to the magic that Tiffany created with thousands of shards of glass and the “newfangled” power of electric light. Period photographs and accounts of his artisans also provide a glimpse into Tiffany’s shop and studio. His method of design, production, and marketing; his reliance on women designers, such as Ohio native Clara Driscoll; and his alliances with both his father’s firm (Tiffany & Co.) and his European counterpart Siegfried Bing (Maison de l’Art Nouveau) lift the curtain on Tiffany’s special brand of artistic creation and success.

Rare masterworks such as the Wisteria, Peacock, Bamboo, and Peony lamps highlight important thematic groups that focus on Tiffany’s many stylistic influences, from Asian to Art Nouveau. The stained glass techniques used by Tiffany’s artisans reveal the firm’s unparalleled standard of quality and the designer’s love for the infinite possibilities of iridescence, texture, and color in manipulating light. Most of the works in this exhibition recently joined the museum’s collection through the generous bequest of Charles Maurer, a Cleveland industrialist and renowned collector of works by Louis Comfort Tiffany. Tiffany in Bloom celebrates this extraordinary gift by providing an unprecedented opportunity to view so many of Tiffany’s great lamps together in a veritable bouquet of splendor.

Major Sponsor
Margaret and Loyal Wilson

Supporting Sponsor
Julia and Larry Pollock

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