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Asheville Art Museum Asheville Art Museum
Asheville, NC

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Asheville Art Museum
2 South Pack Square
Asheville, North Carolina 28801
Phone 828.253.3227
FAX 828.257.4503
Map

Temporaray location during construction
Asheville Art Museum On the Slope
175 Biltmore Avenue
Asheville, North Carolina 28801
(Details at ashevilleart.org.)

E-Mail: mailbox@ashevilleart.org


www.ashevilleart.org

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Exhibitions

Rural Avant-Garde: The Mountain Lake Experience

Golden Hour: Olympians Photographed by Walter Iooss Jr.

Precious Medals: Gold, Silver, Bronze

Artistic Tribute Representation of the Athlete

Artistic Tribute

Public Domain: Photography and the Preservation of Public Lands

Our Strength Is Our People: The Humanist Photographs of Lewis Hine

Old World/New Soil: Foreign-Born American Artists from the Asheville Art Museum Collection

Question Bridge: Black Males

Rural Avant-Garde: The Mountain Lake Experience
August 20, 2021–November 1, 2021
Appleby Foundation Exhibition Hall

Contemporary art, interdisciplinary research communities, and the inspiration of Appalachia converge in Rural Avant-Garde: The Mountain Lake Experience. This exhibition showcases a selection of collaborative creative works that emerged from nearly four decades of the Mountain Lake Workshop series, a program sited in rural southwestern Virginia.

Founded by artist and scholar Ray Kass in 1980 and co-organized with influential art critics Dr. Donald B. Kuspit and Dr. Howard Risatti, as well as the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (VMFA), the Mountain Lake Workshops integrated the arts and sciences in a dynamic experimental creative process that pushed past the traditional boundaries of art, dance, and performance.

Community-centered from its inception, the Mountain Lake Workshop demonstrated the relevance of the arts across disciplines, as well as social and participatory learning. This exhibition offers a focused look at art that investigated new conceptual limits, born of the region in southwestern Virginia, just a few hundred miles north of Asheville, NC. Works range from large-scale watercolors and photographic installation to relics of performances and other experimentations in artmaking.

Highlights include composer and conceptual artist John Cage’s New River Rocks and Washes (1990). A significant late-career work by Cage, this rarely exhibited watercolor extends nearly 30 feet in length, produced using methods of chance to trace stones gathered from the workshop’s natural surroundings.

This exhibition was organized by the Longwood Center for the Visual Arts at Longwood University. Generous funding was provided in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Walter B. Stephen Pottery: Cameo to Crystalline
Through February 21, 2022
Debra McClinton Gallery

Artist Walter B. Stephen contributed to Western North Carolina’s identity as a flourishing site for pottery production and craftsmanship in the early 20th century. This exhibition features art pottery and functional vessels from each stage of Stephen’s career, from his origins discovering the medium alongside his mother in Tennessee to his multi-decade production just outside of Asheville.

In Arden, NC, Stephen founded his third and last pottery studio, Pisgah Forest, which he operated from 1926 until his death in 1961. It was at this studio that the artist perfected the “cameo” decoration technique for which he became best known. His hand-painted images, achieved with layers of white translucent clay, often feature American folk imagery, from covered wagons and livestock to cabins and spinning wheels. A selection of works from the Museum’s Collection showcases his innovation in form and in decorative surface details, including experimentation with crystalline glazing.

Support for this exhibition is provided by the Judy Appleton Memorial Fund and the Michael Lask Fund. This exhibition is organized by the Asheville Art Museum and curated by Alexis Meldrum, curatorial assistant.

Precious Medals: Gold, Silver, Bronze
Thrpugh October 4, 2021
Explore Asheville Exhibition Hall

Precious Medals: Gold, Silver, Bronze highlights works from the Museum’s Collection including glass, ceramic, fashion, and sculpture that use the same metals that are given to the top three placing athletes in an Olympic competition. The precious nature of these three metals is examined in relation to the artworks shown.

Precious Medals is on view in conjunction with the exhibitions Golden Hour: Olympians Photographed by Walter Iooss Jr. and Artistic Tribute: Representation of the Athlete. These exhibitions are organized by the Asheville Art Museum and curated by Whitney Richardson, associate curator.

Artistic Tribute Representation of the Athlete
Through October 4, 2021
Explore Asheville Exhibition Hall

Artistic Tribute: Representation of the Athlete pays homage to the historic Olympic tradition of including the arts as a competition. Until 1948, the modern Olympics included artistic representations of the athletes in painting and sculpture, among other media, as the ancient Olympics had done. This exhibition features artworks from the Museum’s Collection that follow this custom.

Artistic Tribute is on view in conjunction with the exhibitions Golden Hour: Olympians Photographed by Walter Iooss Jr. and Precious Medals: Gold, Silver, Bronze. These exhibitions are organized by the Asheville Art Museum and curated by Whitney Richardson, associate curator.

Our Strength Is Our People: The Humanist Photographs of Lewis Hine
May 7–August 2, 2021
Appleby Foundation Exhibition Hall

This exhibition surveys the life’s work of Lewis Wickes Hine (1874–1940), the father of American documentary photography. Consisting entirely of 65 rare vintage prints, it covers the three overarching themes of Hine’s three-decade career—the immigrant experience, child labor, and the American worker—and culminates in his magnificent studies of the construction of the Empire State Building.

Our Strength Is Our People coincides with the complementary exhibition, Old World/New Soil: Foreign-Born American Artists from the Asheville Art Museum Collection.

Our Strength Is Our People is organized by art2art Circulating Exhibitions, LLC. All works are from the private collection of Michael Mattis & Judith Hochberg. Local support is generously provided by the Workers’ Legacy Foundation.

Old World/New Soil: Foreign-Born American Artists from the Asheville Art Museum Collection
May 7–August 2, 2021
Appleby Foundation Exhibition Hall

Inspired by the book Immigrant Gifts to American Life: Some Experiments in Appreciation of the Contributions of Our Foreign-Born Citizens to American Culture written in 1932 by Allen H. Eaton, a contemporary of Lewis Hine, the exhibition Old World/New Soil calls attention to the collection of works the Museum has acquired from artists who came to the United States either at their own prompting or out of necessity. Just as they adopted America as their new home, we have in turn embraced them, their creative output, and their artwork.

This exhibition coincides with Our Strength Is Our People: The Humanist Photographs of Lewis Hine.

Old World/New Soil: Foreign-Born American Artists from the Asheville Art Museum Collection is curated by Associate Curator Whitney Richardson.

Huffman Gifts of Contemporary Southern Folk Art
April 7–September 13, 2021
Judith S. Moore Gallery

Allen & Barry Huffman have been collecting contemporary Southern folk art for the past 40 years. Both collectors are originally from the South, and their journey together has led them around the southeastern United States, from Florida to Alabama to their hometown of Hickory, NC. In each place, they formed bonds with regional artists and learned first-hand the narratives of each artwork. Within their collection are subsets of folk art, including self-taught artists driven to share their messages, crafts for the tourist market, and southern pottery. The guiding principle evident throughout their collection and the generous donation of contemporary Southern folk art that they’ve gifted to the Asheville Art Museum is the story told by each of these artists through their artworks.

This exhibition is organized by the Asheville Art Museum and curated by Whitney Richardson, associate curator

Question Bridge: Black Males
Ongoing
Multipurpose Space

Question Bridge: Black Males is a project that explores critically challenging issues within the African American male community by instigating a transmedia conversation among Black men across geographic, economic, generational, educational, and social strata of American society. Question Bridge provides a safe setting for necessary, honest expression and healing dialogue on themes that divide, unite, and puzzle Black males today in the United States.

Question Bridge originated in 1996, when artist Chris Johnson (born 1948) was looking for a way to use new-media art to generate meaningful conversation around class and generational divisions within San Diego’s African American community. Mediated through the lens of a video camera, 10 members of the Black community were provided a format to openly express their deeply felt beliefs and values through candid question-and-answer exchanges. None of the questions or answers were prompted. Over the course of four years, Johnson, along with fellow artists Hank Willis Thomas (born 1976), Bayeté Ross Smith (born 1976), and Kamal Sinclair (born 1976), traveled the nation collecting questions and answers from over 150 Black men in eight cities (New York, Chicago, Oakland, San Francisco, Birmingham, Atlanta, New Orleans, and Philadelphia) that comprise a video catalog of 1,500 exchanges. Within this extended community, surprising insights and new possibilities for witnessing our common humanity emerge.

Question Bridge: Black Males is a fiscally sponsored project of the Bay Area Video Coalition—a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization—and supported in part by a grant from the Open Society Institute: Campaign for Black Male Achievement, the California Endowment, the Ford Foundation, the Tribeca Film Institute, the LEF Foundation, the Center for Cultural Innovation, the Nathan Cummings Foundation, and the California College of the Arts. The project was supported by the Sundance Institute’s New Frontier Story Lab.

Learn more: questionbridge.com

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