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Asheville Art Museum Asheville Art Museum
Asheville, NC
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Asheville Art Museum
2 South Pack Square
Asheville, North Carolina 28801
Phone 828.253.3227
FAX 828.257.4503
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Temporaray location during construction
Asheville Art Museum On the Slope
175 Biltmore Avenue
Asheville, North Carolina 28801
(Details at ashevilleart.org.)

E-Mail: mailbox@ashevilleart.org


www.ashevilleart.org

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Exhibitions

Andy Warhol: Silver Clouds

Muddying the Waters: Exploring Traditions in North Carolina Clay

Ernest Trova: Selections from the F.M. Manscapes Portfolio

Reverberations: Exploring Movement in the Collection

Dancing Atoms: Barbara Morgan Photographs

A Telling Instinct: John James Audubon & Contemporary Art

50 Years of Western North Carolina Glass: The James D. & Judith S. Moore Collection

Andy Warhol: Silver Clouds
Through January 4, 2021
Appleby Foundation Exhibition Hall

Andy Warhol’s Silver Clouds create an immersive experience born out of the iconic Pop artist’s interest in innovation and experimentation. Warhol collaborated with Bell Labs engineer Billy Klüver to transform the then-new material Scotchpak into an enlivened and interactive work of art. First shown in April 1966 at the Leo Castelli Gallery in New York City, these air- and helium-filled balloons float like pillows through a space which, combined with their metallic surface, garnered the name Silver Clouds. The clouds notably became part of the design and choreography of Merce Cunningham’s RainForest, which premiered in 1968.

To ensure the safety of Museum visitors and staff, Silver Clouds will be presented as a touch-free experience. Visitors are encouraged to view the work from a distance as the balloons, moved by gentle air currents, drift about the space while imagining the presence of Cunningham’s dancers. A video recording of RainForest in its entirety may be viewed in Reverberations: Exploring Movement in the Collection.

Muddying the Waters: Exploring Traditions in North Carolina Clay
Through February 1, 2021
Debra McClinton Gallery

This exhibition of ceramics explores the movements and connections of makers as a way to push boundaries of regionality and tradition while highlighting the richness and complexity of makers and practices around North Carolina. Curated by former Curatorial Fellow and Windgate Curatorial Intern Sarah Kelly.

Support for this exhibition is provided by the Judy Appleton Memorial Fund and the Michael Lask Fund.

Ernest Trova: Selections from the F.M. Manscapes Portfolio
Through January 4, 2021
The Van Winkle Law Firm Gallery

Ernest Trova creates in the F.M. Manscapes portfolio a world for his iconic Falling Man figure, an every-person he saw as a symbol for a person’s evolution through lived experiences. Vibrant colors, geometric patterns, and repetitive forms merge to communicate a sense of movement and environment as the prints detail the Falling Man’s layered journey.

Reverberations: Exploring Movement in the Collection
Through January 4, 2021
Appleby Foundation Exhibition Hall

Movement in static mediums such as painting, drawing, and photography is difficult to express, yet many artists feel called to explore it. Movement serves as an impetus for creation—to either capture it or create it in entirely different mediums. The works here, selected from the Asheville Art Museum’s Collection, highlight additional approaches to rendering a lasting imprint of the ephemeral. Artists such as Walter Iooss and Blythe Bohnen are concerned with the motion of the human form, evoking a sense of elongated or contracted muscles, of limbs moving through space. Others, like Robyn Horn and Bernar Venet, approach the challenge through abstraction, foregoing representation yet communicating an atmosphere of dynamic change. Marianne Preger-Simon’s drawings of her fellow dancers at Black Mountain College in the summer of 1953 are not only portraits but also a dance of pencil on paper, created in the spirit of artist Josef Albers’s line studies as she simultaneously worked with choreographer Merce Cunningham. Each of these artists ultimately reflects on the time-based ephemeral nature of movement.

Dancing Atoms: Barbara Morgan Photographs
Through January 4, 2021
Appleby Foundation Exhibition Hall

Barbara Morgan, a founding member of the Aperture Foundation, earned a reputation as a Modernist. Much of her work involves dance, photomontage, and a desire to capture motion. She often would design her images so that the figure was shown against neutral or blank backgrounds that heightened the energy of the motion.  As proven in Morgan’s photographs, the exploration of movement is a theme that countless photographers have been drawn to in the past.  Capturing the beauty and effort of kinetic energy on film takes not only a keen photographic eye, but, more importantly, an understanding of the science that creates such action. Morgan was one such photographer.  Her legacy of observing life in relation to “dancing atoms” is forever preserved on film and on paper, providing a glimpse into her world of photography, painting, light, and modern dance.

This exhibition is organized by the Syracuse University Art Galleries.

A Telling Instinct: John James Audubon & Contemporary Art
Through November 30, 2020

John James Audubon’s lifelong obsession to record the natural world resulted in two inspired projects—Birds of America (1827–1838) and The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America (1843–1848). These multi-volume publications wedded art and science but also incorporated a strong moral narrative that generated empathy and recognition in the viewer. A Telling Instinct juxtaposes Audubon prints with the work of artists who continue this tradition of animal allegories and metaphors within the context of the 21st century. Addressing the foibles and strengths that will always be part of the human condition can be made more palatable when told through the guise of the creatures that share our planet. In these portraits of beasts and beings, we often see reflections of our own instinctual selves.

A Telling Instinct: John James Audubon & Contemporary Art is curated by Associate Curator Cindy Buckner, with the assistance of Marilyn Laufer, director emerita of the Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art. It includes prints by John James Audubon from the private collection of Bill & Peg Steiner, and recent works in diverse media by Bo Bartlett, Beth Cavener, Laurie Hogin, Adonna Khare, Anne Lemanski, Kate MacDowell, Mark Messersmith, Joel Sartore, and Tom Uttech.

The Museum

50 Years of Western North Carolina Glass: The James D. & Judith S. Moore Collection
Through November 2, 2020
Judith S. Moore Gallery

James D. and Judith S. Moore have been collecting studio glass from Western North Carolina for the past 40 years. In honor of our reopening, the Moores have generously donated or promised much of their stunning collection to the Museum. This inaugural exhibition in the Judith S. Moore Gallery highlights the beauty of their collection and illustrates the depth with which they have collected certain foundational artists in the Studio Glass Movement.

50 Years of Western North Carolina Glass is organized by the Asheville Art Museum. This exhibition is supported in part by the Judy Appleton Memorial Fund.

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